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Volume 13, Number 5—May 2007

Dispatch

Fatal Disseminated Acanthamoeba lenticulata Acanthamebiasis in a Heart Transplant Patient

Stéphane Barete*Comments to Author , Alain Combes†, Johan F. de Jonckheere‡, Annick Datry†, Shaïda Varnous†, Valérie Martinez†, Sara García Ptacek*, Eric Caumes†, Frédérique Capron†, Camille Francès*, Claude Gibert†, and Olivier Chosidow*
Author affiliations: *Hôpital Tenon, Paris, France; †Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France; ‡Scientific Institute of Public Health, Brussels, Belgium;

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Figure

A) Ulcerated, violaceous plaque on the trunk of the patient with undermined infiltrated peripheral walls. B) Section of the lesion in A showing diffuse dermal-hypodermal necrosis with neutrophil infiltration (thin arrow) and sparse histiocytelike cells (thick arrow) (hematoxylin and eosin–stained, magnification ×10). C) Surgical skin biopsy specimen showing amebic cysts (arrows) in the dermal-hypodermal junction (hematoxylin and eosin–stained, magnification ×20). D) Surgical skin biopsy specimen showing intravascular amebic trophozoite (arrow) characterized by acanthopodia, cytoplasmic vacuoles, and a prominent nucleolus (hematoxylin and eosin–stained, magnification ×40).

Figure. A) Ulcerated, violaceous plaque on the trunk of the patient with undermined infiltrated peripheral walls. B) Section of the lesion in A showing diffuse dermal-hypodermal necrosis with neutrophil infiltration (thin arrow) and sparse histiocytelike cells (thick arrow) (hematoxylin and eosin–stained, magnification ×10). C) Surgical skin biopsy specimen showing amebic cysts (arrows) in the dermal-hypodermal junction (hematoxylin and eosin–stained, magnification ×20). D) Surgical skin biopsy specimen showing intravascular amebic trophozoite (arrow) characterized by acanthopodia, cytoplasmic vacuoles, and a prominent nucleolus (hematoxylin and eosin–stained, magnification ×40).

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