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Volume 14, Number 1—January 2008
THEME ISSUE
International Polar Year

Dispatch

Human Ophthalmomyiasis Interna Caused by Hypoderma tarandi, Northern Canada

Philippe R.S. Lagacé-Wiens*Comments to Author , Ravi Dookeran*, Stuart Skinner*, Richard Leicht*, Douglas D. Colwell†, and Terry D. Galloway*
Author affiliations: *University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; †Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada;

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Figure 2

Figure 2 - Scanning electron microscope images of the parasite from an 11-year-old Inuit boy, Nunavut, Canada. A) Anterior end of the maggot. The cephalic segment is evident; mouth and mouth hooks are present (boxed). Scale bar = 50 μm. B) The characteristic cephalic sensory array (boxed). Scale bar = 10 μm. C) Posterior segments of the maggot. Scale bar = 100 μm. D) Spiracular openings on the posterior segments of the maggot characteristic of first instar of Hypoderma. Scale bar = 10

Figure 2. Scanning electron microscope images of the parasite from an 11-year-old Inuit boy, Nunavut, Canada. A) Anterior end of the maggot. The cephalic segment is evident; mouth and mouth hooks are present (boxed). Scale bar = 50 μm. B) The characteristic cephalic sensory array (boxed). Scale bar = 10 μm. C) Posterior segments of the maggot. Scale bar = 100 μm. D) Spiracular openings on the posterior segments of the maggot characteristic of first instar of Hypoderma. Scale bar = 10 μm.

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