Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Volume 14, Number 1—January 2008
THEME ISSUE
International Polar Year

Perspective

Integrated Approaches and Empirical Models for Investigation of Parasitic Diseases in Northern Wildlife

Eric P. Hoberg*Comments to Author , Lydden Polley†, Emily J. Jenkins†‡, Susan J. Kutz§, Alasdair M. Veitch¶, and Brett T. Elkin#
Author affiliations: *US Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, Maryland, USA; †University of Saskatchewan Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; ‡Environment Canada, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; §University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; ¶Government of the Northwest Territories, Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Canada; #Government of the Northwest Territories, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada

Main Article

Figure 2

Geographic ranges for protostrongylid parasites in northern ungulates showing how survey and inventory have dramatically altered our understanding of diversity and distribution, before (A) and after (B) 1995. Distributions are depicted for Parelaphostrongylus andersoni in caribou (19,20); P. odocoilei in wild thinhorn sheep, mountain goat, woodland caribou, black-tailed deer, and mule deer (15,17); Umingmakstrongylus pallikuukensis in muskoxen (12,14); and a putative new species of Protostrongyl

Figure 2. Geographic ranges for protostrongylid parasites in northern ungulates showing how survey and inventory have dramatically altered our understanding of diversity and distribution, before (A) and after (B) 1995. Distributions are depicted for Parelaphostrongylus andersoni in caribou (19,20); P. odocoilei in wild thinhorn sheep, mountain goat, woodland caribou, black-tailed deer, and mule deer (15,17); Umingmakstrongylus pallikuukensis in muskoxen (12,14); and a putative new species of Protostrongylidae in moose, caribou, and muskoxen (20). The range for P. andersoni in the North is presumed to coincide with caribou, although records substantiated by survey are few (19,20). Protostrongylids have not been detected in ungulates from the Arctic islands and Greenland and may be excluded from these high latitudes under current climate conditions.

Main Article

Top of Page

 

Past Issues

Select a Past Issue:

Art in Science - Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases
Now available for order



CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives, Protecting People, Saving Money. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO