Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to site content
CDC Home

Volume 14, Number 2—February 2008

Research

Effectiveness of Personal Protective Measures to Prevent Lyme Disease

Marietta Vázquez*Comments to Author , Catherine Muehlenbein*, Matthew Cartter†, Edward B. Hayes‡, Starr Ertel†, and Eugene D. Shapiro*
Author affiliations: *Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA; †State of Connecticut Department of Public Health, Hartford, Connecticut, USA; ‡Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA;

Main Article

Table 2

Characteristics of Lyme disease study participants, Connecticut, July 2000 through February 2003

Characteristics Case-patients (N = 709), no. (%) Controls (N = 1,128), no. (%) p value
Age, y
Median 48 49 0.71
Mean 46 47
Range 15–70 15–70
Sex
Female 376 (53) 715 (63) <0.001
Male 333 (47) 413 (37)
Race
Caucasian 689 (97) 1094 (97) 0.66
African American 3 8
Hispanic 4 6
Other 13 14
Underlying medical problems other than Lyme disease (e.g., diabetes, asthma) 298 (42) 508 (45) 0.19
Had Lyme disease* 110 (17) 143 (14) 0.095
Received Lyme vaccine† 44 (6) 73 (6) 0.82

*Having Lyme disease was defined as the following: for case-patients, having Lyme disease at a time other than the episode for which a case-patient was enrolled in the study; for controls, having Lyme disease at a time other than the focal time of disease for the case-patient.
†A study participant was considered vaccinated if he or she received at least 1 dose of Lyme vaccine.

Main Article

Top of Page

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO