Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Volume 14, Number 4—April 2008

Perspective

Bluetongue Epidemiology in the European Union

Claude Saegerman*Comments to Author , Dirk Berkvens†, and Philip S. Mellor‡
Author affiliations: *University of Liège, Liège, Belgium; †Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium; ‡Institute for Animal Health, Pirbright, Surrey, UK

Main Article

Figure 6

Bluetongue virus (BTV) restriction zones in Europe, by serotype. The radial extension of BTV-8 across Europe increases the risk for an encounter between this serotype and other serotypes that occur in the Mediterranean Basin (second epidemiologic system, where serotypes BTV-1, BTV-2, BTV-4, and BTV-16 were identified and the main vector is Culicoides imicola). This situation increases the risk for reassortment of individual BTV gene segments, and, in the more southerly areas, the period of vecto

Figure 6. Bluetongue virus (BTV) restriction zones in Europe, by serotype. The radial extension of BTV-8 across Europe increases the risk for an encounter between this serotype and other serotypes that occur in the Mediterranean Basin (second epidemiologic system, where serotypes BTV-1, BTV-2, BTV-4, and BTV-16 were identified and the main vector is Culicoides imicola). This situation increases the risk for reassortment of individual BTV gene segments, and, in the more southerly areas, the period of vector activity is also likely to extend, leading to a longer BTV-8 season. In addition, BTV-1, which was first identified in sheep with clinical signs of BT in the south of the Iberian Peninsula in July 2007, has extended its range into northern Spain and southwestern France (Pyrénées-Atlantiques), since November 2007; this ongoing expansion is matter of major concern.

Main Article

Top of Page

 

Past Issues

Select a Past Issue:

Art in Science - Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases
Now available for order



CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives, Protecting People, Saving Money. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO