Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Volume 14, Number 7—July 2008

Research

Determinants of Cluster Size in Large, Population-Based Molecular Epidemiology Study of Tuberculosis, Northern Malawi

Judith R. Glynn*Comments to Author , Amelia C. Crampin*†, Hamidou Traore*, Steve Chaguluka†, Donex T. Mwafulirwa†, Saad Alghamdi*, Bagrey M.M. Ngwira†, Malcolm D. Yates‡, Francis D. Drobniewski‡, and Paul E.M. Fine*
Author affiliations: *London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK; †Karonga Prevention Study, Chilumba, Malawi; ‡Health Protection Agency, London;

Main Article

Figure

Geographic distribution of the 4 most common strains defined by restriction fragment length polymorphism: A) strain kps12, B) strain kps121, C) strain kps41, and D) strain kps44. Each o represents a patient. Each square is 10 km × 10 km. The background shading represents the total number of tuberculosis (TB) cases in each area during the study period, which largely reflects the population density.

Figure. Geographic distribution of the 4 most common strains defined by restriction fragment length polymorphism: A) strain kps12, B) strain kps121, C) strain kps41, and D) strain kps44. Each o represents a patient. Each square is 10 km × 10 km. The background shading represents the total number of tuberculosis (TB) cases in each area during the study period, which largely reflects the population density.

Main Article

Top of Page

 

Past Issues

Select a Past Issue:

World Malaria Day - April 25, 2014 - Invest in the future, defeat malaria

Art in Science - Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases
Now available for order



CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives, Protecting People, Saving Money. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO