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Volume 14, Number 9—September 2008

Research

Forest Fragmentation as Cause of Bacterial Transmission among Nonhuman Primates, Humans, and Livestock, Uganda

Tony L. Goldberg1Comments to Author , Thomas R. Gillespie, Innocent B. Rwego, Elizabeth L. Estoff, and Colin A. Chapman
Author affiliations: University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA (T.L. Goldberg, T.R. Gillespie, E.L. Estoff); Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda (T.L. Goldberg, I.B. Rwego, C.A. Chapman); McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada (C.A. Chapman); Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, New York, USA (C.A. Chapman);

Main Article

Figure 1

Map of study area within Kibale National Park, western Uganda (box) and forest fragments and households included in the study. Fragments are (from north to south) Kiko 1, Bugembe, Rurama (see Table 1 for details). Households, park boundary, and fragments are superimposed on a Landsat satellite image (30-m resolution).

Figure 1. Map of study area within Kibale National Park, western Uganda (box) and forest fragments and households included in the study. Fragments are (from north to south) Kiko 1, Bugembe, Rurama (see Table 1 for details). Households, park boundary, and fragments are superimposed on a Landsat satellite image (30-m resolution).

Main Article

1Current affiliation: University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.

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