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Volume 15, Number 1—January 2009

Dispatch

Rotavirus Genotype Distribution after Vaccine Introduction, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Filipe Anibal Carvalho-Costa, Irene Trigueiros Araújo, Rosane Maria Santos de Assis, Alexandre Madi Fialho, Carolina Maria Miranda de Assis Martins, Márcio Neves Bóia, and José Paulo Gagliardi LeiteComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Oswaldo Cruz Institute, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (F.A. Carvalho-Costa, I.T. Araujo, R.M. Santos de Assis, A.M. Fialho, M.N. Bóia, J.P.G. Leite); Salles Netto Municipal Hospital, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (C.M.M. de Assis Martins); Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (M.N. Bóia)

Main Article

Table

Frequency of rotavirus A infection and distribution of G and P genotypes from February 2005 through December 2007, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil*

Vaccination status and year No. samples No. (%) rotaviruspositive No. (%) G1P[8] No. (%) G2P[4] No. (%) G3P[8] No. (%) G9P[8] No. (%) other genotypes, mixed or not typeable
Ineligible for full vaccination†
2005 193 73 (38) 10 (14) 1 (1.4) 22 (30) 33 (45) 7 (9.5)
2006 148 34 (23) 1 (2.9) 14 (41) 6 (8) 5 (5) 8 (23)
2007
49
12 (24)
1 (8)
11 (92)



Vaccinated‡
2006 6 Negative§
2007
33
4 (12)

4 (100)



Not vaccinated
2006 8 Negative§
2007
27
10 (37)

10 (100)



Total 464 133 (29) 12 (9) 40 (30) 28 (21) 38 (29) 15 (11)

*–, absence of genotypes.
†Born before January 1, 2006, or <4 months of age.
‡Children were considered vaccinated if they had received 2 doses of vaccine.
§All stool samples were negative for rotavirus.

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