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Volume 15, Number 10—October 2009

Dispatch

Novel Rickettsia in Ticks, Tasmania, Australia

Leonard IzzardComments to Author , Stephen Graves, Erika Cox, Stan Fenwick, Nathan Unsworth, and John Stenos
Author affiliations: Australian Rickettsial Reference Laboratory, Geelong, Victoria, Australia (L. Izzard, S. Graves, J. Stenos); Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia, Australia (L. Izzard, S. Fenwick, J. Stenos); Launceston General Hospital, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia (E. Cox); Texas A&M Health Science Center, College Station, Texas, USA (N. Unsworth)

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Figure 2

Phylogenetic tree showing the relationship of a 4,834-bp fragment of the outer membrane protein B gene of Candidatus Rickettsia tasmanensis (in boldface) among all validated rickettsia species. The tree was prepared by using the neighbor-joining algorithm within the MEGA 4 software (10). Bootstrap values are indicated at each node. Scale bar indicates 2% nucleotide divergence.

Figure 2. Phylogenetic tree showing the relationship of a 4,834-bp fragment of the outer membrane protein B gene of Candidatus Rickettsia tasmanensis (in boldface) among all validated rickettsia species. The tree was prepared by using the neighbor-joining algorithm within the MEGA 4 software (10). Bootstrap values are indicated at each node. Scale bar indicates 2% nucleotide divergence.

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