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Volume 15, Number 11—November 2009

Dispatch

Dengue Virus Serotype 4, Northeastern Peru, 2008

Brett M. Forshey, Amy C. Morrison, Cristhopher Cruz, Claudio Rocha, Stalin Vilcarromero, Carolina Guevara, Daria E. Camacho, Araceli Alava, César Madrid, Luis Beingolea, Víctor Suarez, Guillermo Comach, and Tadeusz J. KochelComments to Author 
Author affiliations: US Naval Medical Research Center Detachment, Lima and Iquitos, Peru (B.M. Forshey, A.C. Morrison, C. Cruz, C. Rocha, S. Vilcarromero, C. Guevara, T.J. Kochel); University of California, Davis, California, USA (A.C. Morrison); Laboratorio Regional de Diagnostico e Investigación del Dengue y otras Enfermedades Virales, Maracay, Estado Aragua, Venezuela (D.E. Camacho, G. Comach); Instituto Nacional de Higiene y Medicina Tropical "Leopoldo Izquieta Pérez", Guayaquil, Ecuador (A. Alava); Naval Hospital, Guayaquil (C. Madrid); Dirección General de Epidemiología, Ministerio de Salud, Lima (L. Beingolea); Instituto Nacional de Salud, Lima (V. Suarez)

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Figure 2

Phylogenetic analysis of the envelope gene of dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV–4) strains from Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Similar topologies were observed from neighbor-joining (depicted), maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony analyses, implemented in PAUP* v.4.0b10 (12). The general time reversible model of evolution was used for neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood analyses. DENV-4 genotype I strains (not shown) were included as an outgroup. Bootstrap values (based on 1,000 replicates)

Figure 2. Phylogenetic analysis of the envelope gene of dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV–4) strains from Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Similar topologies were observed from neighbor-joining (depicted), maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony analyses, implemented in PAUP* v.4.0b10 (12). The general time reversible model of evolution was used for neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood analyses. DENV-4 genotype I strains (not shown) were included as an outgroup. Bootstrap values (based on 1,000 replicates) >65 are shown at major nodes. Isolates first reported in this study are shown in boldface and with sample identification code. Some sequenced isolates from Peru and Venezuela that share high nucleotide identity (>99.7%) with depicted strains were omitted to reduce redundancy and improve clarity of the figure. Sequences were deposited in the GenBank database under the accession nos. GQ139572–GQ139577 (Ecuador), GQ139547–GQ139571 (Peru), and GQ139578–GQ139591 (Venezuela). Scale bar indicates number of nucleotide substitutions per site.

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