Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Volume 15, Number 7—July 2009

Dispatch

Co-infections with Chikungunya Virus and Dengue Virus in Delhi, India

Harendra S. Chahar, Preeti Bharaj, Lalit Dar, Randeep Guleria, Sushil K. Kabra, and Shobha BroorComments to Author 
Author affiliations: All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Main Article

Figure 2

Phylogenetic analysis of partial envelop 1 (E1) gene sequences (294 bp) of chikungunya virus strains from the 2006 dengue outbreak in Delhi, India. Neighbor-joining tree was constructed by using E1 gene sequences from various chikungunya virus sequences. O’nyong-nyong virus (AF079456) was used as an outgroup. Percentage bootstrap support is indicated by the values at each node. Delhi strains are indicated by a diamond. Scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site.

Figure 2. Phylogenetic analysis of partial envelop 1 (E1) gene sequences (294 bp) of chikungunya virus strains from the 2006 dengue outbreak in Delhi, India. Neighbor-joining tree was constructed by using E1 gene sequences from various chikungunya virus sequences. O’nyong-nyong virus (AF079456) was used as an outgroup. Percentage bootstrap support is indicated by the values at each node. Delhi strains are indicated by a diamond. Scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site.

Main Article

Top of Page

 

Past Issues

Select a Past Issue:

World Malaria Day - April 25, 2014 - Invest in the future, defeat malaria

20th Anniversary - National Infant Immunization Week - Immunization. Power to Protect.

Art in Science - Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases
Now available for order



CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives, Protecting People, Saving Money. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO