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Volume 15, Number 7—July 2009

Research

Risk Factors for Human Infection with Puumala Virus, Southwestern Germany

Anne Caroline SchwarzComments to Author , Ulrich Ranft, Isolde Piechotowski, James E. Childs, and Stefan O. Brockmann
Author affiliations: Bernhard-Nocht-Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany (A.C. Schwarz); Institut für umweltmedizinische Forschung, Düsseldorf, Germany (U. Ranft); Baden-Württemberg State Health Office, Stuttgart, Germany (I. Piechotowski, S.O. Brockmann); Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA (J.E. Childs)

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Table 1

Nephropathia epidemica in Baden-Württemberg, Germany, by year, 2001–2007*

Year No. cases† Incidence/100,000 population
  Temperature, °C
  Beechnut crop¶
Winter‡
  Spring§
Min Med Max Min Med Max Min Med Max Min Med Max
2001 37 0.0 0.25 4.5   2.0 2.5 3.5   2.0 2.5 2.5   0 0 1
2002 140 0.0 0.0 11.18   −0.5 0.5 0.0   3.0 3.5 3.5   1 2 2
2003 55 0.0 0.0 3.33   0.5 1.0 1.5   −0.5 0.0 1.0   1 1 2
2004 109 0.0 0.27 6.01   0.5 0.5 1.5   0.0 1.0 1.5   1 1 2
2005 105 0.0 0.70 4.07   0.0 −0.5 1.0   −1.5 −1.0 −0.5   1 1 2
2006 17 0.0 0.0 1.16   −2.0 −1.5 −1.0   −2.0 −1.5 −1.0   0 0 0
2007 1,077 0.0 2.28 90.19   3.0 2.5 3.0   2.0 2.5 3.0   2 2 2

*Min, minimum; med, median; max, maximum.
†Total no. cases for all districts in Baden-Württemberg.
‡Temperature deviation from the long-term average for December of the previous year and January of the actual year.
§Temperature deviation from the long-term average for February and March.
¶Beechnut crop of the preceding year in 3 categories: 0, poor crop (0%–9% of a mast year); 1, medium crop (10%–39% of a mast year); 2, good/excellent
crop (40%–100% of a mast year).

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