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Volume 16, Number 1—January 2010

Research

Methicillin-Resistant and -Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Infections in Dogs

Meredith C. FairesComments to Author , Michelle Traverse, Kathy C. Tater, David L. Pearl, and J. Scott Weese
Author affiliations: University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada (M.C. Faires, D.L. Pearl, J.S. Weese); University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA (M. Traverse); Angell Animal Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA (K.C. Tater)

Main Article

Table 1

Univariable analysis of demographic (signalment) risk factors for MRSA versus MSSA infections in dogs, United States and Canada, 2001–2007*

Variable MRSA, no. (%) dogs, n = 40 MSSA, no. (%) dogs, n = 80† Odds ratio (95% CI) p value‡
Breed, kg
Small, 1–10 10 (25) 11/79 (13.9) Ref
Medium, >10–25 16 (40) 28/79 (35.4) 0.63 (0.19–2.01) 0.43
Large, >25
14 (35)
40/79 (50.6)
0.39 (0.12–1.25)
0.10
Age group, y
<2 10 (25) 13 (16.3) Ref
3–8 20 (50) 43 (53.8) 0.63 (0.22–1.78) 0.34
>8
10 (25)
24 (30)
0.54 (0.15–1.91)
0.39
Sex
F 14 (35) 36 (45) Ref
M 26 (65) 44 (55) 1.47 (0.65–3.45) 0.35

*MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; MSSA, methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus; CI, confidence interval; Ref, referent category. Dogs with MRSA (case-patients) and MSSA (controls) infections were matched for veterinary referral hospital and date of admission.
†Except as indicated.
‡Score method for estimating p values does not assume a symmetrical distribution for discrete data. p<0.05 was considered significant.

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