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Volume 16, Number 2—February 2010

Perspective

Effects of Coronavirus Infections in Children

Nicola PrincipiComments to Author , Samantha Bosis, and Susanna Esposito
Author affiliations: University of Milan, Milan, Italy; and Fondazione Istituto Di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico “Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mangiagalli e Regine Elena,” Milan

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Table

Main studies of the epidemiology and clinical relevance of HCoV-HKU1 in infants and children*

Study Location and period Population No. samples tested No. (%) patients with positive test results Comments
Lau et al. (20) Hong Kong; 
2004 Apr–2005 Mar 629 children with RTIs, 6 mo–5 y; inpatients 629 10 (1.6) 11 patients with URTIs, 1 with pneumonia, 1 with bronchiolitis, 5 with febrile seizures; 3 with underlying disease
Vabret et al. (24) Canada; 
2005 Feb–Mar 83 children with RTIs, <5 y; negative for RSV, influenza A/B, PIV 1–3, adenovirus; inpatients 83 5 (6.0) 3 patients with gastroenteritis, 1 with febrile seizures; mean age 26 mo
Sloots et al. (25) Australia; 
2004 May–Aug 259 children with RTIs, <5 y; inpatients and outpatients 259 10 (3.8) 1 patient with co-infection
Talbot et al. (34) USA; 
2001 Oct–2003 Sep 1,055 children with RTIs, <5 y; inpatients 1,055 4 (0.4) Mild episodes

*HCoV, human coronavirus; RTI, respiratory tract infection; URTI, upper respiratory tract infection; RSV, respiratory syncytial virus; PIV, parainfluenza virus.

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