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Volume 16, Number 2—February 2010

Letter

Bronchial Casts and Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus Infection

Maki Hasegawa, Yasuji InamoComments to Author , Tatsuo Fuchigami, Koji Hashimoto, Miyuki Morozumi, Kimiko Ubukata, Haruo Watanabe, and Takashi TakahashiComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Nihon University Nerima-Hikarigaoka Hospital, Tokyo, Japan (M. Hasegawa, Y. Inamo, T. Fuchigami, K. Hashimoto); Graduate School of Infection Control Sciences, Kitasato University, Tokyo (M. Morozumi, K. Ubukata, T. Takahashi); National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (H. Watanabe)

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Figure

A) Chest radiograph obtained at hospital admission from a child infected with influenza subtype H1N1 virus. The image shows atelectasis of the right lung and hyperinflation of the left lung; arrows indicate obstruction of the right main bronchus. B) Macroscopic bronchial casts extracted by intratracheal suction. C) Chest radiograph obtained on hospital day 2, indicating partial resolution of atelectasis of the right lower lobe. D) Light micrograph of casts, characterized by predominant eosinophi

Figure. A) Chest radiograph obtained at hospital admission from a child infected with influenza subtype H1N1 virus. The image shows atelectasis of the right lung and hyperinflation of the left lung; arrows indicate obstruction of the right main bronchus. B) Macroscopic bronchial casts extracted by intratracheal suction. C) Chest radiograph obtained on hospital day 2, indicating partial resolution of atelectasis of the right lower lobe. D) Light micrograph of casts, characterized by predominant eosinophil infiltration (>90% of cells) (May-Giemsa stain, original magnification ×1,000). Arrows indicate typical eosinophil granules.

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