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Volume 17, Number 10—October 2011

Letter

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and Seasonal Influenza A (H3N2) in Children’s Hospital, Australia

Gulam Khandaker, David Lester-Smith, Yvonne Zurynski, Elizabeth J. Elliott, and Robert BooyComments to Author 
Author affiliations: The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

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Table

Comparison of influenza-related hospitalizations, Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, Australia, 2003, 2007, and 2009 influenza seasons*

Characteristics† 2009, pandemic (H1N1) 2009, no. (%), n = 167 Seasonal influenza A (H3N2), no. (%)
2007, n = 119 2003, n = 257‡
PICU admissions 18 (10.8) 12 (10.1) 22 (8.6)
Fatal cases (within 30 d of hospital admission)
0
0
3 (1.2)
Ventilated 7 (4.2) 6 (5.0) 14 (5.4)
Treated with antiviral drug§
92 (55.1)
16 (13.4)
0
Symptoms
Vomiting‡ 59 (35.3) 16 (13.4) NA
Diarrhea 21 (12.6) 8 (6.7) NA
Seizure
11 (6.6)
7 (5.9)
NA
Complications
Any complication 65 (38.9) 35 (29.4) NA
Pneumonia¶ 42 (25.1) 15 (12.6) NA
Encephalopathy
5 (3.0)
2 (1.7)
NA
Preexisting condition 78 (46.7) 60 (50.4) NA

*PICU, pediatric intensive care unit; NA, not available.
†Length of hospital stay, mean (range), d: pandemic (H1N1) 2009, 5.9 (1–107); seasonal influenza in 2007, 4.1 (1–50); seasonal influenza in 2003, 4 (1–28). Length of PICU stay, mean (range), d: pandemic (H1N1) 2009, 3.7 (1–30); seasonal influenza in 2007, 4.3 (1–25); seasonal influenza in 2003, 3.3 (0.6–11.4) Data for length of PICU stay in 2003 exclude 3 deaths; 1.3, 2.3, and 4.8 d after PICU admission (2.8 d mean PICU stay).
‡Only isolates from the 22 PICU case-patients were subtyped; all were H3N2.
§p = 0.0001.
¶p = 0.0104.

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