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Volume 17, Number 6—June 2011

Research

Binary Toxin and Death after Clostridium difficile Infection

Sabrina BacciComments to Author , Kåre Mølbak, Marianne K. Kjeldsen, and Katharina E.P. Olsen
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training, Stockholm, Sweden (S. Bacci); Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark (S. Bacci, K. Mølbak, M.K. Kjeldsen, K.E.P. Olsen)

Main Article

Table 1

Characteristics of case-patients according to group of Clostridium difficile infection, week 1, 2008–week 22, 2009, Denmark

Characteristic No. (%) CD unselected, n = 1,822 No binary toxin
Presence of binary toxin
No. (%) CD A and B, n = 212 No. (%) CD 027, n = 193 No. (%) CD non-027, n = 72*
Male sex
796 (43.7)

100 (47.2)

87 (45.1)
31 (43.1)
Age group, y
<50 494 (27.1) 30 (14.2) 9 (4.6) 7 (9.7)
50–59 166 (9.1) 14 (6.6) 8 (4.1) 8 (11.1)
60–69 280 (15.4) 33 (15.6) 25 (13.0) 14 (19.4)
70–79 367 (20.1) 70 (33.0) 52 (26.9) 16 (22.2)
>80
514 (28.2)

65 (30.7)

99 (51.3)
27 (37.5)
Region of local microbiology laboratory
Capital region 263 (14.4) 46 (21.7) 164 (85.0) 22 (30.5)
Other parts of Denmark 1,502 (83.4) 158 (74.4) 29 (15.0) 50 (69.4)

*Consisting of C. difficile (CD) PCR ribotype 078 (n = 24), PCR ribotype 066 (n = 26), and PCR ribotype 023 and others (n = 22).

Main Article

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