Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 17, Number 9—September 2011

Research

Endemic Scrub Typhus–like Illness, Chile

M. Elvira Balcells, Ricardo Rabagliati, Patricia García, Helena Poggi, David Oddó, Marcela Concha, Katia Abarca, Ju Jiang, Daryl J. KellyComments to Author , Allen L. Richards, and Paul A. Fuerst
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile (M.E. Bacells, R. Rabagliati, P. García, H. Poggi, D. Oddó, M. Concha, K. Abarca); Naval Medical Research Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA (J. Jiang, A.L. Richards); The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA (D.J. Kelly, P.A. Fuerst)

Main Article

Figure 3

Evolutionary relationships of Chiloé Island sample compared with other isolates of Orientia tsutsugamushi, with O. chuto sp. nov. and with taxa from Rickettsia, determined by the method of neighbor joining (15). The tree is drawn to scale; scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site. Numbers on branches represent percentage of 1,000 bootstrap replicates that include the enclosed clade. Entries on the tree are identified by GenBank accession number and isolate name.

Figure 3. Evolutionary relationships of Chiloé Island sample compared with other isolates of Orientia tsutsugamushi, with O. chuto sp. nov. and with taxa from Rickettsia, determined by the method of neighbor joining (15). The tree is drawn to scale; scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site. Numbers on branches represent percentage of 1,000 bootstrap replicates that include the enclosed clade. Entries on the tree are identified by GenBank accession number and isolate name.

Main Article

TOP