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Volume 18, Number 4—April 2012

Dispatch

Cosavirus Infection in Persons with and without Gastroenteritis, Brazil

Andreas Stöcker1, Breno Frederico de Carvalho Dominguez Souza1, Tereza Cristina Medrado Ribeiro1, Eduardo Martins Netto, Luciana Oliveira Araujo, Jefferson Ivan Corrêa, Patrícia Silva Almeida, Angela Peixoto de Mattos, Hugo da Costa Ribeiro, Diana Brasil Pedral-Sampaio, Christian Drosten, and Jan Felix DrexlerComments to Author 
Author affiliations: University of Bonn Medical Centre, Bonn, Germany (A. Stöcker, C. Drosten, J.F. Drexler); Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil (A. Stocker, B.F.C.D. Souza, T.C.M. Ribeiro, E.M. Netto, L.O. Araujo, J.I. Corrêa, P.S. Almeida, A.P. de Mattos, H.C. Ribeiro Jr, D.B. Pedral Sampaio)

Main Article

Figure 2

Co-infections and fecal cosavirus (CosV) RNA concentrations. A) Co-infections with established viral causes of diarrhea in children with gastroenteritis who were positive for CosV. Viral RNA and DNA were detected by real-time PCR (methods available upon request) in the same eluates used for CosV detection. B) Boxplot generated with SPSS V19 (SPSS, Munich, Germany) of log10 CosV RNA concentrations per gram of feces in children with gastroenteritis and healthy control children from a child-care ce

Figure 2. Co-infections and fecal cosavirus (CosV) RNA concentrations. A) Co-infections with established viral causes of diarrhea in children with gastroenteritis who were positive for CosV. Viral RNA and DNA were detected by real-time PCR (methods available upon request) in the same eluates used for CosV detection. B) Boxplot generated with SPSS V19 (SPSS, Munich, Germany) of log10 CosV RNA concentrations per gram of feces in children with gastroenteritis and healthy control children from a child-care center in 2008 and 2011. Boxes show the medians and interquartile ranges (box length). The whiskers represent an extension of the 25th or 75th percentiles by 1.5× the interquartile range. Datum points beyond the whisker range are considered as outliers and marked as circles. GGI/II, genogroups I and II.

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to this article.

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