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Volume 19, Number 4—April 2013

Research

Predicting Hotspots for Influenza Virus Reassortment

Trevon L. FullerComments to Author , Marius Gilbert, Vincent Martin, Julien Cappelle, Parviez Hosseini, Kevin Y. Njabo, Soad Abdel Aziz, Xiangming Xiao, Peter Daszak, and Thomas B. Smith
Author affiliations: University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA (T.L. Fuller, K.Y. Njabo, T.B. Smith); Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium (M. Gilbert); Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Beijing, People’s Republic of China (V. Martin); Centre de Cooperation International en Recherche Agronomique pour le Developpement, Montpellier, France (J. Cappelle); EcoHealth Alliance, New York, New York, USA (P. Hosseini, P. Daszak); National Laboratory for Quality Control on Poultry Production, Dokki, Giza, Egypt (S.A. Aziz); University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA (X. Xiao)

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Figure 4

Reassortment areas elsewhere in Asia based on the People’s Republic of China model constructed from the influenza virus subtype H5N1 outbreak dataset. A) Probability of subtype H3N2 and H5N1 co-occurrence (according to the subtype H5N1 outbreak dataset). B) Areas with a probability of subtype H5N1 and H3N2 co-occurrence >50% and above average swine density. C) Areas with a probability of subtype H5N1 and H3N2 co-occurrence >50% and above average human population density. See Technical Appe

Figure 4. . . Reassortment areas elsewhere in Asia based on the People’s Republic of China model constructed from the influenza virus subtype H5N1 outbreak dataset. A) Probability of subtype H3N2 and H5N1 co-occurrence (according to the subtype H5N1 outbreak dataset). B) Areas with a probability of subtype H5N1 and H3N2 co-occurrence >50% and above average swine density. C) Areas with a probability of subtype H5N1 and H3N2 co-occurrence >50% and above average human population density. See , for corresponding models based on the surveillance dataset.

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