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Volume 7, Number 1—February 2001

Synopsis

Quinolone and Macrolide Resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli: Resistance Mechanisms and Trends in Human Isolates

Jørgen Engberg*Comments to Author , Frank M. Aarestrup†, Diane E. Taylor‡, Peter Gerner-Smidt*, and Irving Nachamkin§
Author affiliations: *Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark; †Frank Aarestrup, Danish Veterinary Laboratory, Copenhagen, Denmark; ‡Diane E. Taylor, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; §Irving Nachamkin, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Main Article

Figure 1

Macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms reported in Campylobacter species. For macrolide resistance, mutations are at either position shown (Escherichia coli coordinates) in up to all three copies of ribosomal RNA (14,15, and CA Trieber & DE Taylor, unpub. data). Fluoroquinolone resistance depends on a mutation in the quinolone resistance determining region of DNA gyrase A (GyrA). For typical MICs see text and references 16-18. The strains with highest resistance levels had mutat

Figure 1. Macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms reported in Campylobacter species. For macrolide resistance, mutations are at either position shown (Escherichia coli coordinates) in up to all three copies of ribosomal RNA (14,15, and CA Trieber & DE Taylor, unpub. data). Fluoroquinolone resistance depends on a mutation in the quinolone resistance determining region of DNA gyrase A (GyrA). For typical MICs see text and references 16-18. The strains with highest resistance levels had mutations in both GyrA and topoisomerase IV ParC.

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