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Volume 8, Number 9—September 2002

Research

Public Health Impact of Reemergence of Rabies, New York

Hwa-Gan H. Chang*Comments to Author , Millicent Eidson*†, Candace Noonan-Toly*, Charles V. Trimarchi*, Robert Rudd*, Barbara J. Wallace*†, Perry F. Smith*†, and Dale L. Morse*†
Author affiliations: *New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York, USA; †School of Public Health, University at Albany, Albany, New York, USA;

Main Article

Table 1

Rabid animals by species, human exposure, and postexposure treatment, New York, 1993–1998a

Animal
species No. (%)of rabid animals
No. (range)b of humans receiving PET
without
human exposure with
human exposure
Raccoon
Skunk
Bat
Fox
Cat
Cow
Woodchuck
Deer
Dog
Horse
Beaver
Goat
Bobcat
Coyote
Rabbit
Sheep
Ferret
Otherc
Total 4,983 (79.1)
895 (14.2)
221 (3.5)
101 (1.6)
18 (0.3)
12 (0.8)
44 (0.7)
14 (0.2)
3 (<0.1)
1 (<0.1)
2 (<0.1)
0
0
1 (<0.1)
1 (<0.1)
0
0
6 (<0.1)
6,302 (100) 1,666 (65.2)
266 (10.4)
184 (7.2)
127 (5.0)
166 (6.5)
54 (2.1)
21 (0.8)
10 (0.4)
20 (0.8)
22 (0.9)
4 (0.2)
4 (0.2)
3 (<0.1)
2 (<0.1)
2 (<0.1)
2 (<0.1)
2 (<0.1)
1 (<0.1)
2,556 (100) 2,944 (1–25)
470 (1–8)
377 (1–12)
229 (1–10)
844 (1–36)
246 (1–30)
32 (1–5)
42 (1–13)
286 (1–37)
139 (1–14)
9 (1–3)
476 (1–465)
7 (1–4)
2 (1)
12 (5–7)
7 (2–5)
16 (3–13)
1 (1)
6,139 (1–465)

aPET, postexposure treatment.
bRange of number of PETs for a single exposure incident for a rabid animal
cOther species included one rabid opossum resulting in human PET, three rabid opossums, one fisher, one pig, and one otter without consequent human PET.

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