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Volume 8, Number 9—September 2002

Research

Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Institutionalized Adults with Developmental Disabilities1

Abraham Borer*, Jacob Gilad*, Pablo Yagupsky*, Nechama Peled*, Nurith Porat*, Ronit Trefler*, Hannah Shprecher-Levy†, Klaris Riesenberg*, Miriam Shipman*, and Francisc Schlaeffer*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Soroka University Medical Center and the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel; †Carmel Medical Center, Haifa, Israel;

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Figure 2

Pulse-field gel electrophoresis of study isolates obtained during the first survey on December 1997 from residents and staff. Lambda ladder and the DNA of the reference Streptococcus pneumoniae strain R6, digested by SmaI, were used as molecular weight markers. The gel includes 25 representative MRSA isolates. All isolates but one show an indistinguishable banding pattern, thus representing the outbreak strain. Isolate number 23 shows a closely related pattern (one band difference) and is considered to belong to the outbreak strain.

Figure 2. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis of study isolates obtained during the first survey on December 1997 from residents and staff. Lambda ladder and the DNA of the reference Streptococcus pneumoniae strain R6, digested by SmaI, were used as molecular weight markers. The gel includes 25 representative MRSA isolates. All isolates but one show an indistinguishable banding pattern, thus representing the outbreak strain. Isolate number 23 shows a closely related pattern (one band difference) and is considered to belong to the outbreak strain.

Main Article

1This work has been presented in part at the 38th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC), San Diego, California, USA, September 24–27, 1998.

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