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Volume 9, Number 12—December 2003

Research

Raccoon Roundworm Eggs near Homes and Risk for Larva Migrans Disease, California Communities

Gabriel P. Roussere*, William J. Murray*Comments to Author , Caroline B. Raudenbush*, Michael J. Kutilek*, Darcy J. Levee*, and Kevin R. Kazacos†
Author affiliations: *San Jose State University, San Jose, California, USA; †Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA

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Figure 3

Baylisascaris procyonis eggs recovered from raccoon feces from a latrine in a playground sandbox. Left, infective egg containing a fully formed larva (40x). Right, an undeveloped or degenerate noninfective egg. B. procyonis eggs are ellipsoid, approximately 75 μm x 60 μm in size, with a brown, finely granular surface. (Reprinted from Clinical Microbiology Newsletter 2002;24:1–7; with permission from Elsevier Science.)

Figure 3Baylisascaris procyonis eggs recovered from raccoon feces from a latrine in a playground sandbox. Left, infective egg containing a fully formed larva (40x). Right, an undeveloped or degenerate noninfective egg. B. procyonis eggs are ellipsoid, approximately 75 μm x 60 μm in size, with a brown, finely granular surface. (Reprinted from Clinical Microbiology Newsletter 2002;24:1–7; with permission from Elsevier Science.)

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