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Volume 9, Number 2—February 2003

Research

Annual Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Risk and Interpretation of Clustering Statistics

Emilia Vynnycky*Comments to Author , Martien W. Borgdorff†, Dick van Soolingen‡, and Paul E.M. Fine*
Author affiliations: *London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, England; †Royal Netherlands Tuberculosis Association, The Hague, the Netherlands; ‡National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, the Netherlands

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Figure 4

Model predictions of A) the overall percentage of cases clustered during different time periods from 1993 to 1997 and B) the age-specific percentage of (male) cases clustered during the period 1993–1995 in the Netherlands and in settings in which the annual risk for infection has remained unchanged over time at 0.1%, 1%, and 3%. The clustering observed in the Netherlands, after excluding clusters involving immigrants, is also shown.

Figure 4. Model predictions of A) the overall percentage of cases clustered during different time periods from 1993 to 1997 and B) the age-specific percentage of (male) cases clustered during the period 1993–1995 in the Netherlands and in settings in which the annual risk for infection has remained unchanged over time at 0.1%, 1%, and 3%. The clustering observed in the Netherlands, after excluding clusters involving immigrants, is also shown.

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