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Volume 9, Number 5—May 2003

Research

Seasonal Patterns of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

Scott F. Dowell*†Comments to Author , Cynthia G. Whitney†, Carolyn Wright†, Charles E. Rose†, and Anne Schuchat†
Author affiliations: *International Emerging Infections Program, Bangkok, Thailand; †Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Table

Characteristics of persons with invasive pneumococcal disease during an annual winter spike in incidence compared with those experiencing invasive pneumococcal disease during the surrounding weeks, 1996–1998.a

Characteristic Percentage of patients with characteristic
p valueb
Nonspike (N=1,647) Spike (N=1,351)
Sex (% male)
54.9
51.4
0.07
Race (% white)
56.6
60.8
0.07
Age (% adult)
74.3
81.7
0.0000013
Survival
87.1
87.5
0.92
State


0.49
California
6.0
4.9

Connecticut
17.7
18.9

Georgia
25.6
25.3

Maryland
20.2
19.1

Minnesota
10.4
11.3

Oregon
6.8
5.8

Tennessee
13.3
14.7

Syndrome


0.24
Bacteremia
35.6
33.0

Pneumonia
56.4
59.6

Meningitis 4.9 4.6

aThe spike period was defined as December 20–January 10 of each year, and the nonspike periods were December 1–19 and January 11–31.
bp value calculated by chi-square test of the 2 x N table, with Yates correction.

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