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Volume 9, Number 7—July 2003

Research

West Nile Virus in Farmed Alligators

Debra L. Miller*Comments to Author , Michael J. Mauel*, Charles Baldwin*, Gary Burtle*, Dallas Ingram*, Murray E. Hines*, and Kendal S. Frazier*
Author affiliations: *University of Georgia, Tifton, Georgia, USA

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Figure 2

West Nile virus (WNV) reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results from epizootic die-offs in farm-raised alligators. The expected amplicon is 248 bp. Lane 1, a 100-bp molecular weight ladder. Lane 2, the positive WNV control. Lane 3, fresh tissue samples from a juvenile alligator in the 2002 epizootic. Lane 4, virus isolation cell homogenate from a juvenile alligator in the 2002 epizootic. Lane 5, horsemeat that was being fed to alligators during the 2002 epizootic. Lane 6, initial p

Figure 2. West Nile virus (WNV) reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results from epizootic die-offs in farm-raised alligators. The expected amplicon is 248 bp. Lane 1, a 100-bp molecular weight ladder. Lane 2, the positive WNV control. Lane 3, fresh tissue samples from a juvenile alligator in the 2002 epizootic. Lane 4, virus isolation cell homogenate from a juvenile alligator in the 2002 epizootic. Lane 5, horsemeat that was being fed to alligators during the 2002 epizootic. Lane 6, initial postepizootic horsemeat shipment. Lanes 7, 8, and 9, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of juvenile alligators in 2001 and 2002. Lane 10, fresh tissue from a wild alligator. Lane 11, negative WNV control.

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