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Volume 21, Number 5—May 2015
Dispatch

Novel Eurasian Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A H5 Viruses in Wild Birds, Washington, USA, 2014

Hon S. Ip1, Mia Kim Torchetti1Comments to Author , Rocio Crespo, Paul Kohrs, Paul DeBruyn, Kristin G. Mansfield, Timothy Baszler, Lyndon Badcoe, Barbara Bodenstein, Valerie Shearn-Bochsler, Mary Lea Killian, Janice C. Pedersen, Nichole Hines, Thomas Gidlewski, Thomas J. DeLiberto, and Jonathan M. Sleeman
Author affiliations: US Geologic Survey–National Wildlife Health Center, Madison, Wisconsin, USA (H.S. Ip, B. Bodenstein, V. Shearn-Bochsler, J.M. Sleeman); US Department of Agriculture, Ames, Iowa, USA (M.K. Torchetti, M.L. Killian, J.C. Pedersen, N. Hines); Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA (R. Crespo, T. Baszler); Washington Department of Agriculture, Olympia, Washington, USA (P. Kohrs, T. Baszler, L. Badcoe); Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia (P. DeBruyn, K.G. Mansfield); US Department of Agriculture, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA (T. Gidlewski, T. DeLiberto)

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Figure 1

Phylogenetic comparison of the complete hemagglutinin genes of highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N2) and A(H5N8) strains from the United States with strains from Asia, Europe, and Canada. Solid circles indicate H5N2 and H5N8 strains from the United States; open circle indicates H5N2 strain from Canada; black triangle indicates H5N8 strain from a crane in Japan. Sequences were aligned by using MUSCLE, and phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analyses were conducted by using MEGA version 5,

Figure 1. Phylogenetic comparison of the complete hemagglutinin genes of highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N2) and A(H5N8) strains from the United States with strains from Asia, Europe, and Canada. Solid circles indicate H5N2 and H5N8 strains from the United States; open circle indicates H5N2 strain from Canada; black triangle indicates H5N8 strain from a crane in Japan. Sequences were aligned by using MUSCLE, and phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analyses were conducted by using MEGA version 5, using the neighbor-joining tree-building method, with 1,000 bootstrap replicates (10). Scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site. Analysis was done with viruses that were phylogenetically representative of appropriate lineages (Influenza Virus Resource Database, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genomes/FLU/FLU.html).

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References
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1These first authors contributed equally to this article.

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