Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Emerging Infectious Diseases journal

Synopses

  • Medscape CME Activity
    Exposure Characteristics of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome Patients, United States, 1993–2015 PDF Version [PDF - 533 KB - 7 pages]
    A. de St. Maurice et al.
    View Summary

    Those at highest risk are persons in occupations with potential for rodent exposure and American Indian women 40­–64 years of age.

            Cite This Article
    EID de St. Maurice A, Ervin E, Schumacher M, Yaglom H, VinHatton E, Melman S, et al. Exposure Characteristics of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome Patients, United States, 1993–2015. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):733-739. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161770
    AMA de St. Maurice A, Ervin E, Schumacher M, et al. Exposure Characteristics of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome Patients, United States, 1993–2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):733-739. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161770.
    APA de St. Maurice, A., Ervin, E., Schumacher, M., Yaglom, H., VinHatton, E., Melman, S....Knust, B. (2017). Exposure Characteristics of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome Patients, United States, 1993–2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 733-739. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161770.
        Email Email this Article

Research

  • Control of Malaria Vector Mosquitoes by Insecticide-Treated Combinations of Window Screens and Eave Baffles PDF Version [PDF - 1.27 MB - 8 pages]
    G. F. Killeen et al.
        View Abstract

    We assessed window screens and eave baffles (WSEBs), which enable mosquitoes to enter but not exit houses, as an alternative to indoor residual spraying (IRS) for malaria vector control. WSEBs treated with water, the pyrethroid lambda-cyhalothrin, or the organophosphate pirimiphos-methyl, with and without a binding agent for increasing insecticide persistence on netting, were compared with IRS in experimental huts. Compared with IRS containing the same insecticide, WSEBs killed similar proportions of Anopheles funestus mosquitoes that were resistant to pyrethroids, carbamates and organochlorines and greater proportions of pyrethroid-resistant, early exiting An. arabiensis mosquitoes. WSEBs with pirimiphos-methyl killed greater proportions of both vectors than lambda-cyhalothrin or lambda-cyhalothrin plus pirimiphos-methyl and were equally efficacious when combined with binding agent. WSEBs required far less insecticide than IRS, and binding agents might enhance durability. WSEBs might enable affordable deployment of insecticide combinations to mitigate against physiologic insecticide resistance and improve control of behaviorally resistant, early exiting vectors.

        Cite This Article
    EID Killeen GF, Masalu JP, Chinula D, Fotakis EA, Kavishe DR, Malone D, et al. Control of Malaria Vector Mosquitoes by Insecticide-Treated Combinations of Window Screens and Eave Baffles. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):782-789. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.160662
    AMA Killeen GF, Masalu JP, Chinula D, et al. Control of Malaria Vector Mosquitoes by Insecticide-Treated Combinations of Window Screens and Eave Baffles. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):782-789. doi:10.3201/eid2305.160662.
    APA Killeen, G. F., Masalu, J. P., Chinula, D., Fotakis, E. A., Kavishe, D. R., Malone, D....Okumu, F. (2017). Control of Malaria Vector Mosquitoes by Insecticide-Treated Combinations of Window Screens and Eave Baffles. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 782-789. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.160662.
        Email Email this Article
  • Insecticide-Treated Nets and Protection against Insecticide-Resistant Malaria Vectors in Western Kenya PDF Version [PDF - 928 KB - 7 pages]
    E. Ochomo et al.
        View Abstract

    Insecticide resistance might reduce the efficacy of malaria vector control. In 2013 and 2014, malaria vectors from 50 villages, of varying pyrethroid resistance, in western Kenya were assayed for resistance to deltamethrin. Long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLIN) were distributed to households at universal coverage. Children were recruited into 2 cohorts, cleared of malaria-causing parasites, and tested every 2 weeks for reinfection. Infection incidence rates for the 2 cohorts were 2.2 (95% CI 1.9–2.5) infections/person-year and 2.8 (95% CI 2.5–3.0) infections/person-year. LLIN users had lower infection rates than non-LLIN users in both low-resistance (rate ratio 0.61, 95% CI 0.42–0.88) and high-resistance (rate ratio 0.55, 95% CI 0.35–0.87) villages (p = 0.63). The association between insecticide resistance and infection incidence was not significant (p = 0.99). Although the incidence of infection was high among net users, LLINs provided significant protection (p = 0.01) against infection with malaria parasite regardless of vector insecticide resistance.

        Cite This Article
    EID Ochomo E, Chahilu M, Cook J, Kinyari T, Bayoh NM, West P, et al. Insecticide-Treated Nets and Protection against Insecticide-Resistant Malaria Vectors in Western Kenya. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):758-764. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161315
    AMA Ochomo E, Chahilu M, Cook J, et al. Insecticide-Treated Nets and Protection against Insecticide-Resistant Malaria Vectors in Western Kenya. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):758-764. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161315.
    APA Ochomo, E., Chahilu, M., Cook, J., Kinyari, T., Bayoh, N. M., West, P....Mbogo, C. (2017). Insecticide-Treated Nets and Protection against Insecticide-Resistant Malaria Vectors in Western Kenya. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 758-764. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161315.
        Email Email this Article
  • Prevention of Chronic Hepatitis B after 3 Decades of Escalating Vaccination Policy, China PDF Version [PDF - 1.62 MB - 8 pages]
    F. Cui et al.
        View Abstract

    China’s hepatitis B virus (HBV) prevention policy has been evaluated through nationally representative serologic surveys conducted in 1992 and 2006. We report results of a 2014 serologic survey and reanalysis of the 1992 and 2006 surveys in the context of program policy. The 2014 survey used a 2-stage sample strategy in which townships were selected from 160 longstanding, nationally representative, county-level disease surveillance points, and persons 1–29 years of age were invited to participate. The 2014 sample size was 31,713; the response rate was 83.3%. Compared with the 1992 pre–recombinant vaccine survey, HBV surface antigen prevalence declined 46% by 2006 and by 52% by 2014. Among children <5 years of age, the decline was 97%. China’s HBV prevention program, targeted toward interrupting perinatal transmission, has been highly successful and increasingly effective. However, this progress must be sustained for decades to come, and elimination of HBV transmission will require augmented strategies.

        Cite This Article
    EID Cui F, Shen L, Li L, Wang H, Wang F, Bi S, et al. Prevention of Chronic Hepatitis B after 3 Decades of Escalating Vaccination Policy, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):765-772. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161477
    AMA Cui F, Shen L, Li L, et al. Prevention of Chronic Hepatitis B after 3 Decades of Escalating Vaccination Policy, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):765-772. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161477.
    APA Cui, F., Shen, L., Li, L., Wang, H., Wang, F., Bi, S....Yin, Z. (2017). Prevention of Chronic Hepatitis B after 3 Decades of Escalating Vaccination Policy, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 765-772. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161477.
        Email Email this Article
  • Medscape CME Activity
    Increased Neurotropic Threat from Burkholderia pseudomallei Strains with a B. mallei–like Variation in the bimA Motility Gene, Australia PDF Version [PDF - 2.39 MB - 10 pages]
    J. L. Morris et al.
    View Summary

    These strains have heightened pathogenic potential for rapid dissemination to multiple tissues, including the central nervous system.

        View Abstract

    Neurologic melioidosis is a serious, potentially fatal form of Burkholderia pseudomallei infection. Recently, we reported that a subset of clinical isolates of B. pseudomallei from Australia have heightened virulence and potential for dissemination to the central nervous system. In this study, we demonstrate that this subset has a B. mallei–like sequence variation of the actin-based motility gene, bimA. Compared with B. pseudomallei isolates having typical bimA alleles, isolates that contain the B. mallei–like variation demonstrate increased persistence in phagocytic cells and increased virulence with rapid systemic dissemination and replication within multiple tissues, including the brain and spinal cord, in an experimental model. These findings highlight the implications of bimA variation on disease progression of B. pseudomallei infection and have considerable clinical and public health implications with respect to the degree of neurotropic threat posed to human health.

        Cite This Article
    EID Morris JL, Fane A, Sarovich DS, Price EP, Rush CM, Govan BL, et al. Increased Neurotropic Threat from Burkholderia pseudomallei Strains with a B. mallei–like Variation in the bimA Motility Gene, Australia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):740-749. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.151417
    AMA Morris JL, Fane A, Sarovich DS, et al. Increased Neurotropic Threat from Burkholderia pseudomallei Strains with a B. mallei–like Variation in the bimA Motility Gene, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):740-749. doi:10.3201/eid2305.151417.
    APA Morris, J. L., Fane, A., Sarovich, D. S., Price, E. P., Rush, C. M., Govan, B. L....Ketheesan, N. (2017). Increased Neurotropic Threat from Burkholderia pseudomallei Strains with a B. mallei–like Variation in the bimA Motility Gene, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 740-749. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.151417.
        Email Email this Article
  • Population Genomics of Legionella longbeachae and Hidden Complexities of Infection Source Attribution PDF Version [PDF - 3.54 MB - 8 pages]
    R. Bacigalupe et al.
        View Abstract

    Legionella longbeachae is the primary cause of legionellosis in Australasia and Southeast Asia and an emerging pathogen in Europe and the United States; however, our understanding of the population diversity of L. longbeachae from patient and environmental sources is limited. We analyzed the genomes of 64 L. longbeachae isolates, of which 29 were from a cluster of legionellosis cases linked to commercial growing media in Scotland in 2013 and 35 were non–outbreak-associated isolates from Scotland and other countries. We identified extensive genetic diversity across the L. longbeachae species, associated with intraspecies and interspecies gene flow, and a wide geographic distribution of closely related genotypes. Of note, we observed a highly diverse pool of L. longbeachae genotypes within compost samples that precluded the genetic establishment of an infection source. These data represent a view of the genomic diversity of L. longbeachae that will inform strategies for investigating future outbreaks.

        Cite This Article
    EID Bacigalupe R, Lindsay D, Edwards G, Fitzgerald J. Population Genomics of Legionella longbeachae and Hidden Complexities of Infection Source Attribution. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):750-757. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161165
    AMA Bacigalupe R, Lindsay D, Edwards G, et al. Population Genomics of Legionella longbeachae and Hidden Complexities of Infection Source Attribution. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):750-757. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161165.
    APA Bacigalupe, R., Lindsay, D., Edwards, G., & Fitzgerald, J. (2017). Population Genomics of Legionella longbeachae and Hidden Complexities of Infection Source Attribution. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 750-757. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161165.
        Email Email this Article
  • Lack of Durable Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies Against Zika Virus from Dengue Virus Infection PDF Version [PDF - 1.72 MB - 9 pages]
    M. H. Collins et al.
        View Abstract

    Cross-reactive antibodies elicited by dengue virus (DENV) infection might affect Zika virus infection and confound serologic tests. Recent data demonstrate neutralization of Zika virus by monoclonal antibodies or human serum collected early after DENV infection. Whether this finding is true in late DENV convalescence (>6 months after infection) is unknown. We studied late convalescent serum samples from persons with prior DENV or Zika virus exposure. Despite extensive cross-reactivity in IgG binding, Zika virus neutralization was not observed among primary DENV infections. We observed low-frequency (23%) Zika virus cross-neutralization in repeat DENV infections. DENV-immune persons who had Zika virus as a secondary infection had distinct populations of antibodies that neutralized DENVs and Zika virus, as shown by DENV-reactive antibody depletion experiments. These data suggest that most DENV infections do not induce durable, high-level Zika virus cross-neutralizing antibodies. Zika virus–specific antibody populations develop after Zika virus infection irrespective of prior DENV immunity.

        Cite This Article
    EID Collins MH, McGowan E, Jadi R, Young E, Lopez CA, Baric RS, et al. Lack of Durable Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies Against Zika Virus from Dengue Virus Infection. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):773-781. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161630
    AMA Collins MH, McGowan E, Jadi R, et al. Lack of Durable Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies Against Zika Virus from Dengue Virus Infection. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):773-781. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161630.
    APA Collins, M. H., McGowan, E., Jadi, R., Young, E., Lopez, C. A., Baric, R. S....de Silva, A. M. (2017). Lack of Durable Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies Against Zika Virus from Dengue Virus Infection. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 773-781. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161630.
        Email Email this Article
  • Use of Blood Donor Screening Data to Estimate Zika Virus Incidence, Puerto Rico, April–August 2016 PDF Version [PDF - 1.22 MB - 6 pages]
    M. S. Chevalier et al.
        View Abstract

    Puerto Rico has been heavily impacted by Zika virus, a mosquitoborne flavivirus that emerged in the Americas during 2015. Although most persons with Zika virus show no symptoms, the virus can cause neurologic and other complications, including fetal microcephaly. Local Zika virus transmission in Puerto Rico has been reported since December 2015. To prevent transfusion-associated transmission, local blood collection ceased in March 2016 but resumed in April 2016 after Zika virus screening of blood donations became available. Using data from screening of blood donations collected by the 2 largest blood centers in Puerto Rico during April 3–August 12, 2016, and assuming a 9.9-day duration of viremia, we estimated that 469,321 persons in Puerto Rico were infected during this period, for an estimated cumulative incidence of 12.9%. Results from blood donation screening during arboviral outbreaks can supplement routine clinical and surveillance data for improved targeting of prevention efforts.

        Cite This Article
    EID Chevalier MS, Biggerstaff BJ, Basavaraju SV, Ocfemia M, Alsina JO, Climent-Peris C, et al. Use of Blood Donor Screening Data to Estimate Zika Virus Incidence, Puerto Rico, April–August 2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):790-795. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161873
    AMA Chevalier MS, Biggerstaff BJ, Basavaraju SV, et al. Use of Blood Donor Screening Data to Estimate Zika Virus Incidence, Puerto Rico, April–August 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):790-795. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161873.
    APA Chevalier, M. S., Biggerstaff, B. J., Basavaraju, S. V., Ocfemia, M., Alsina, J. O., Climent-Peris, C....Kuehnert, M. J. (2017). Use of Blood Donor Screening Data to Estimate Zika Virus Incidence, Puerto Rico, April–August 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 790-795. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161873.
        Email Email this Article
  • Invasive Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections among Cardiothoracic Surgical Patients Exposed to Heater–Cooler Devices PDF Version [PDF - 1.99 MB - 10 pages]
    M. M. Lyman et al.
        View Abstract

    Invasive nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections may result from a previously unrecognized source of transmission, heater–cooler devices (HCDs) used during cardiac surgery. In July 2015, the Pennsylvania Department of Health notified the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) about a cluster of NTM infections among cardiothoracic surgical patients at 1 hospital. We conducted a case–control study to identify exposures causing infection, examining 11 case-patients and 48 control-patients. Eight (73%) case-patients had a clinical specimen identified as Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). HCD exposure was associated with increased odds of invasive NTM infection; laboratory testing identified patient isolates and HCD samples as closely related strains of M. chimaera, a MAC species. This investigation confirmed a large US outbreak of invasive MAC infections in a previously unaffected patient population and suggested transmission occurred by aerosolization from HCDs. Recommendations have been issued for enhanced surveillance to identify potential infections associated with HCDs and measures to mitigate transmission risk.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lyman MM, Grigg C, Kinsey C, Keckler M, Moulton-Meissner H, Cooper E, et al. Invasive Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections among Cardiothoracic Surgical Patients Exposed to Heater–Cooler Devices. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):796-805. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161899
    AMA Lyman MM, Grigg C, Kinsey C, et al. Invasive Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections among Cardiothoracic Surgical Patients Exposed to Heater–Cooler Devices. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):796-805. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161899.
    APA Lyman, M. M., Grigg, C., Kinsey, C., Keckler, M., Moulton-Meissner, H., Cooper, E....Perkins, K. M. (2017). Invasive Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections among Cardiothoracic Surgical Patients Exposed to Heater–Cooler Devices. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 796-805. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161899.
        Email Email this Article

Historical Review

  • Anthrax Cases Associated with Animal-Hair Shaving Brushes PDF Version [PDF - 560 KB - 3 pages]
    C. M. Szablewski et al.
        View Abstract

    During the First World War, anthrax cases in the United States and England increased greatly and seemed to be associated with use of new shaving brushes. Further investigation revealed that the source material and origin of shaving brushes had changed during the war. Cheap brushes of imported horsehair were being made to look like the preferred badger-hair brushes. Unfortunately, some of these brushes were not effectively disinfected and brought with them a nasty stowaway: Bacillus anthracis. A review of outbreak summaries, surveillance data, and case reports indicated that these cases originated from the use of ineffectively disinfected animal-hair shaving brushes. This historical information is relevant to current public health practice because renewed interest in vintage and animal-hair shaving brushes has been seen in popular culture. This information should help healthcare providers and public health officials answer questions on this topic.

        Cite This Article
    EID Szablewski CM, Hendricks K, Bower WA, Shadomy SV, Hupert N. Anthrax Cases Associated with Animal-Hair Shaving Brushes. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):806-808. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161554
    AMA Szablewski CM, Hendricks K, Bower WA, et al. Anthrax Cases Associated with Animal-Hair Shaving Brushes. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):806-808. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161554.
    APA Szablewski, C. M., Hendricks, K., Bower, W. A., Shadomy, S. V., & Hupert, N. (2017). Anthrax Cases Associated with Animal-Hair Shaving Brushes. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 806-808. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161554.
        Email Email this Article

Dispatches

  • Exposure Risk for Infection and Lack of Human-to-Human Transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease, Australia PDF Version [PDF - 600 KB - 4 pages]
    D. P. O’Brien et al.
        View Abstract

    We conducted epidemiologic and genetic analyses of family clusters of Mycobacterium ulcerans (Buruli ulcer) disease in southeastern Australia. We found that the incidence of M. ulcerans disease in family members was increased. However, the risk for exposure appeared short-term and not related to human-human transmission.

        Cite This Article
    EID O’Brien DP, Wynne JW, Buultjens AH, Michalski WP, Stinear TP, Friedman N, et al. Exposure Risk for Infection and Lack of Human-to-Human Transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease, Australia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):837-840. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.160809
    AMA O’Brien DP, Wynne JW, Buultjens AH, et al. Exposure Risk for Infection and Lack of Human-to-Human Transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):837-840. doi:10.3201/eid2305.160809.
    APA O’Brien, D. P., Wynne, J. W., Buultjens, A. H., Michalski, W. P., Stinear, T. P., Friedman, N....Athan, E. (2017). Exposure Risk for Infection and Lack of Human-to-Human Transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 837-840. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.160809.
        Email Email this Article
  • Amoxicillin and Ceftriaxone as Treatment Alternatives to Penicillin for Maternal Syphilis PDF Version [PDF - 594 KB - 3 pages]
    Y. Katanami et al.
        View Abstract

    There is no proven alternative to penicillin for treatment of maternal syphilis. We report 2 case-patients with maternal syphilis who were successfully treated without penicillin. We used amoxicillin and probenecid for the first case-patient and amoxicillin, probenecid, and ceftriaxone for the second case-patient.

        Cite This Article
    EID Katanami Y, Hashimoto T, Takaya S, Yamamoto K, Kutsuna S, Takeshita N, et al. Amoxicillin and Ceftriaxone as Treatment Alternatives to Penicillin for Maternal Syphilis. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):827-829. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161936
    AMA Katanami Y, Hashimoto T, Takaya S, et al. Amoxicillin and Ceftriaxone as Treatment Alternatives to Penicillin for Maternal Syphilis. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):827-829. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161936.
    APA Katanami, Y., Hashimoto, T., Takaya, S., Yamamoto, K., Kutsuna, S., Takeshita, N....Ohmagari, N. (2017). Amoxicillin and Ceftriaxone as Treatment Alternatives to Penicillin for Maternal Syphilis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 827-829. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161936.
        Email Email this Article
  • Increasing Macrolide and Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium PDF Version [PDF - 9.10 MB - 4 pages]
    G. L. Murray et al.
        View Abstract

    Escalating resistance to azithromycin and moxifloxacin is being reported for Mycoplasma genitalium in the Asia-Pacific region. Analyzing 140 infections, we found pretreatment fluoroquinolone-resistance mutations in parC (13.6%) and gyrA (5%). ParC S83 changes were associated with moxifloxacin failure. Combined macrolide/fluoroquinolone-resistance mutations were in 8.6% of specimens, for which recommended therapies would be ineffective.

        Cite This Article
    EID Murray GL, Bradshaw CS, Bissessor M, Danielewski J, Garland SM, Jensen JS, et al. Increasing Macrolide and Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):809-812. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161745
    AMA Murray GL, Bradshaw CS, Bissessor M, et al. Increasing Macrolide and Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):809-812. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161745.
    APA Murray, G. L., Bradshaw, C. S., Bissessor, M., Danielewski, J., Garland, S. M., Jensen, J. S....Tabrizi, S. N. (2017). Increasing Macrolide and Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 809-812. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161745.
        Email Email this Article
  • Reassortant Clade 2.3.4.4 Avian Influenza A(H5N6) Virus in a Wild Mandarin Duck, South Korea, 2016 PDF Version [PDF - 1.48 MB - 4 pages]
    J. Kwon et al.
        View Abstract

    A reassortant clade 2.3.4.4 avian influenza A(H5N6) virus was isolated from a fecal sample of a Mandarin duck (Aix galericulata) in South Korea during October 2016. This virus was genetically similar to H5N6 subtype virus isolates from China, Vietnam, Laos, and Hong Kong, including human isolates.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kwon J, Lee D, Swayne DE, Noh J, Yuk S, Erdene-Ochir T, et al. Reassortant Clade 2.3.4.4 Avian Influenza A(H5N6) Virus in a Wild Mandarin Duck, South Korea, 2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):822-826. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161905
    AMA Kwon J, Lee D, Swayne DE, et al. Reassortant Clade 2.3.4.4 Avian Influenza A(H5N6) Virus in a Wild Mandarin Duck, South Korea, 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):822-826. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161905.
    APA Kwon, J., Lee, D., Swayne, D. E., Noh, J., Yuk, S., Erdene-Ochir, T....Song, C. (2017). Reassortant Clade 2.3.4.4 Avian Influenza A(H5N6) Virus in a Wild Mandarin Duck, South Korea, 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 822-826. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161905.
        Email Email this Article
  • Regional Transmission of Salmonella Paratyphi A, China, 1998–2012 PDF Version [PDF - 1.59 MB - 4 pages]
    X. Lu et al.
        View Abstract

    To explore transmission patterns and genetic relationships of Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A in China, we conducted a genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis on the strains in the 4 provinces in which incidence was highest during 1998–2012. Markedly phylogeographic clustering suggested regional virus circulation after introduction from areas in southeastern China.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lu X, Li Z, Yan M, Pang B, Xu J, Kan B, et al. Regional Transmission of Salmonella Paratyphi A, China, 1998–2012. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):833-836. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.151539
    AMA Lu X, Li Z, Yan M, et al. Regional Transmission of Salmonella Paratyphi A, China, 1998–2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):833-836. doi:10.3201/eid2305.151539.
    APA Lu, X., Li, Z., Yan, M., Pang, B., Xu, J., & Kan, B. (2017). Regional Transmission of Salmonella Paratyphi A, China, 1998–2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 833-836. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.151539.
        Email Email this Article
  • Survey of Treponemal Infections in Free-Ranging and Captive Macaques, 1999–2012 PDF Version [PDF - 612 KB - 4 pages]
    A. R. Klegarth et al.
        View Abstract

    Survey results showed treponemal infection among pet macaques in Southeast Asia, a region with a high prevalence of human yaws. This finding, along with studies showing treponemal infection in nonhuman primates in Africa, should encourage a One Health approach to yaws eradication and surveillance activities, possibly including monitoring of nonhuman primates in yaws-endemic regions.

        Cite This Article
    EID Klegarth AR, Ezeonwu CA, Rompis A, Lee B, Aggimarangsee N, Chalise M, et al. Survey of Treponemal Infections in Free-Ranging and Captive Macaques, 1999–2012. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):816-819. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161838
    AMA Klegarth AR, Ezeonwu CA, Rompis A, et al. Survey of Treponemal Infections in Free-Ranging and Captive Macaques, 1999–2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):816-819. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161838.
    APA Klegarth, A. R., Ezeonwu, C. A., Rompis, A., Lee, B., Aggimarangsee, N., Chalise, M....Jones-Engel, L. (2017). Survey of Treponemal Infections in Free-Ranging and Captive Macaques, 1999–2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 816-819. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161838.
        Email Email this Article
  • Azithromycin Resistance and Decreased Ceftriaxone Susceptibility in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Hawaii, USA PDF Version [PDF - 507 KB - 3 pages]
    J. R. Papp et al.
        View Abstract

    During 2016, eight Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from 7 patients in Hawaii were resistant to azithromycin; 5 had decreased in vitro susceptibility to ceftriaxone. Genomic analysis demonstrated a distinct phylogenetic clade when compared with local contemporary strains. Continued evolution and widespread transmission of these strains might challenge the effectiveness of current therapeutic options.

        Cite This Article
    EID Papp JR, Abrams A, Nash E, Katz AR, Kirkcaldy RD, O’Connor NP, et al. Azithromycin Resistance and Decreased Ceftriaxone Susceptibility in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Hawaii, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):830-832. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.170088
    AMA Papp JR, Abrams A, Nash E, et al. Azithromycin Resistance and Decreased Ceftriaxone Susceptibility in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Hawaii, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):830-832. doi:10.3201/eid2305.170088.
    APA Papp, J. R., Abrams, A., Nash, E., Katz, A. R., Kirkcaldy, R. D., O’Connor, N. P....Whelen, A. (2017). Azithromycin Resistance and Decreased Ceftriaxone Susceptibility in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Hawaii, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 830-832. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.170088.
        Email Email this Article
  • Estimated Incubation Period for Zika Virus Disease PDF Version [PDF - 1.13 MB - 5 pages]
    E. R. Krow-Lucal et al.
        View Abstract

    Information about the Zika virus disease incubation period can help identify risk periods and local virus transmission. In 2015–2016, data from 197 symptomatic travelers with recent Zika virus infection indicated an estimated incubation period of 3–14 days. For symptomatic persons with symptoms >2 weeks after travel, transmission might be not travel associated.

        Cite This Article
    EID Krow-Lucal ER, Biggerstaff BJ, Staples J. Estimated Incubation Period for Zika Virus Disease. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):841-845. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161715
    AMA Krow-Lucal ER, Biggerstaff BJ, Staples J. Estimated Incubation Period for Zika Virus Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):841-845. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161715.
    APA Krow-Lucal, E. R., Biggerstaff, B. J., & Staples, J. (2017). Estimated Incubation Period for Zika Virus Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 841-845. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161715.
        Email Email this Article
  • Phenotypic and Genotypic Shifts in Hepatitis B Virus in Treatment-Naive Patients, Taiwan, 2008–2012 PDF Version [PDF - 1.00 MB - 2 pages]
    C. Yeh et al.
        View Abstract

    We examined the characteristic changes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in antiviral drug treatment–naive patients referred for pretreatment evaluation in Taiwan during 2008–2012. Over time, we observed substantial decreases in the prevalence of HBV e antigen (HBeAg) and increasing prevalence of the precore G1899A mutation and HBV-DNA levels in HBeAg-positive patients.

        Cite This Article
    EID Yeh C, Liang K, Chang M, Hsu C, Chen Y, Lin C, et al. Phenotypic and Genotypic Shifts in Hepatitis B Virus in Treatment-Naive Patients, Taiwan, 2008–2012. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):820-821. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161894
    AMA Yeh C, Liang K, Chang M, et al. Phenotypic and Genotypic Shifts in Hepatitis B Virus in Treatment-Naive Patients, Taiwan, 2008–2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):820-821. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161894.
    APA Yeh, C., Liang, K., Chang, M., Hsu, C., Chen, Y., Lin, C....Lai, M. (2017). Phenotypic and Genotypic Shifts in Hepatitis B Virus in Treatment-Naive Patients, Taiwan, 2008–2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 820-821. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161894.
        Email Email this Article
  • Population Responses during the Pandemic Phase of the Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Epidemic, Hong Kong, China PDF Version [PDF - 1.85 MB - 3 pages]
    N. Yeung et al.
        View Abstract

    During August 2009–July 2010, we conducted 7 longitudinal telephone surveys among 503 adults in Hong Kong, China, to explore changes in their behavioral and psychological responses to the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus epidemic. Trends were examined using generalized estimating equations models. Findings showed that responses varied with the course of the pandemic.

        Cite This Article
    EID Yeung N, Lau J, Choi K, Griffiths S. Population Responses during the Pandemic Phase of the Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Epidemic, Hong Kong, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):813-815. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.160768
    AMA Yeung N, Lau J, Choi K, et al. Population Responses during the Pandemic Phase of the Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Epidemic, Hong Kong, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):813-815. doi:10.3201/eid2305.160768.
    APA Yeung, N., Lau, J., Choi, K., & Griffiths, S. (2017). Population Responses during the Pandemic Phase of the Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Epidemic, Hong Kong, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 813-815. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.160768.
        Email Email this Article
  • Virulence Analysis of Bacillus cereus Isolated after Death of Preterm Neonates, Nice, France, 2013 PDF Version [PDF - 1.32 MB - 4 pages]
    R. Lotte et al.
        View Abstract

    After the deaths of 2 preterm neonates with Bacillus cereus systemic infection in the same intensive care unit, we investigated the pathogenic potential of this bacterium. Genetic and virulence analysis indicated the neonates were infected with 2 different strains with a virulence potential similar to environmental strains, indicating likely patient immune response failure.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lotte R, Hérissé A, Berrouane Y, Lotte L, Casagrande F, Landraud L, et al. Virulence Analysis of Bacillus cereus Isolated after Death of Preterm Neonates, Nice, France, 2013. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):845-848. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161788
    AMA Lotte R, Hérissé A, Berrouane Y, et al. Virulence Analysis of Bacillus cereus Isolated after Death of Preterm Neonates, Nice, France, 2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):845-848. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161788.
    APA Lotte, R., Hérissé, A., Berrouane, Y., Lotte, L., Casagrande, F., Landraud, L....Ruimy, R. (2017). Virulence Analysis of Bacillus cereus Isolated after Death of Preterm Neonates, Nice, France, 2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 845-848. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161788.
        Email Email this Article

Another Dimension

  • The Discovery of Penicillin—New Insights After More Than 75 Years of Clinical Use PDF Version [PDF - 1.48 MB - 5 pages]
    R. Gaynes
        View Abstract

    After just over 75 years of penicillin’s clinical use, the world can see that its impact was immediate and profound. In 1928, a chance event in Alexander Fleming’s London laboratory changed the course of medicine. However, the purification and first clinical use of penicillin would take more than a decade. Unprecedented United States/Great Britain cooperation to produce penicillin was incredibly successful by 1943. This success overshadowed efforts to produce penicillin during World War II in Europe, particularly in the Netherlands. Information about these efforts, available only in the last 10–15 years, provides new insights into the story of the first antibiotic. Researchers in the Netherlands produced penicillin using their own production methods and marketed it in 1946, which eventually increased the penicillin supply and decreased the price. The unusual serendipity involved in the discovery of penicillin demonstrates the difficulties in finding new antibiotics and should remind health professionals to expertly manage these extraordinary medicines.

        Cite This Article
    EID Gaynes R. The Discovery of Penicillin—New Insights After More Than 75 Years of Clinical Use. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):849-853. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161556
    AMA Gaynes R. The Discovery of Penicillin—New Insights After More Than 75 Years of Clinical Use. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):849-853. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161556.
    APA Gaynes, R. (2017). The Discovery of Penicillin—New Insights After More Than 75 Years of Clinical Use. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 849-853. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161556.
        Email Email this Article

Research Letters

  • Management of Bartonella Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis without Cardiac Surgery PDF Version [PDF - 336 KB - 3 pages]
    P. Papineni et al.
        View Abstract

    Two cases of Bartonella prosthetic valve endocarditis were cured when treated for 2 weeks with gentamicin and 3 months with doxycycline. Clinical cure correlated with decreased Bartonella antibody titers. This report suggests a strategy to monitor, treat, and cure Bartonella prosthetic valve endocarditis.

        Cite This Article
    EID Papineni P, Carroll A, Radvan J, Hemsley C, Chambers J, Cortes N, et al. Management of Bartonella Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis without Cardiac Surgery. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):861-863. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161238
    AMA Papineni P, Carroll A, Radvan J, et al. Management of Bartonella Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis without Cardiac Surgery. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):861-863. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161238.
    APA Papineni, P., Carroll, A., Radvan, J., Hemsley, C., Chambers, J., Cortes, N....Klein, J. L. (2017). Management of Bartonella Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis without Cardiac Surgery. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 861-863. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161238.
        Email Email this Article
  • Persistence of Zika Virus in Breast Milk after Infection in Late Stage of Pregnancy
    J. R. Sotelo et al.
        View Abstract

    We detected Zika virus in breast milk of a woman in Brazil infected with the virus during the 36th week of pregnancy. Virus was detected 33 days after onset of signs and symptoms and 9 days after delivery. No abnormalities were found during fetal assessment or after birth of the infant.

        Cite This Article
    EID Sotelo JR, Sotelo AB, Sotelo F, Doi AM, Pinho J, Oliveira R, et al. Persistence of Zika Virus in Breast Milk after Infection in Late Stage of Pregnancy. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):854-856. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161538
    AMA Sotelo JR, Sotelo AB, Sotelo F, et al. Persistence of Zika Virus in Breast Milk after Infection in Late Stage of Pregnancy. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):854-856. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161538.
    APA Sotelo, J. R., Sotelo, A. B., Sotelo, F., Doi, A. M., Pinho, J., Oliveira, R....Mangueira, C. (2017). Persistence of Zika Virus in Breast Milk after Infection in Late Stage of Pregnancy. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 854-856. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161538.
        Email Email this Article
  • mcr-1 Colistin Resistance in ESBL-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, France PDF Version [PDF - 352 KB - 3 pages]
    Y. Caspar et al.
        View Abstract

    We report intestinal carriage of an extended-spectrum β-lactamase−producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strain with high-level resistance to colistin (MIC 24 mg/L) in a patient in France who had been hospitalized for fungal meningitis. The strain had the mcr-1 plasmid gene and an inactivated mgrB gene, which are associated with colistin resistance.

        Cite This Article
    EID Caspar Y, Maillet M, Pavese P, Francony G, Brion J, Mallaret M, et al. mcr-1 Colistin Resistance in ESBL-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):874-876. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161942
    AMA Caspar Y, Maillet M, Pavese P, et al. mcr-1 Colistin Resistance in ESBL-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):874-876. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161942.
    APA Caspar, Y., Maillet, M., Pavese, P., Francony, G., Brion, J., Mallaret, M....Maurin, M. (2017). mcr-1 Colistin Resistance in ESBL-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 874-876. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161942.
        Email Email this Article
  • Diagnosis and Management of Borrelia turicatae Infection in Febrile Soldier, Texas, USA PDF Version [PDF - 328 KB - 2 pages]
    A. M. Christensen et al.
        View Abstract

    In August 2015, a soldier returned from field exercises in Texas, USA, with nonspecific febrile illness. Culture and sequencing of spirochetes from peripheral blood diagnosed Borrelia turicatae infection. The patient recovered after receiving doxycycline. No illness occurred in asymptomatic soldiers potentially exposed to the vector tick and prophylactically given treatment.

        Cite This Article
    EID Christensen AM, Pietralczyk E, Lopez JE, Brooks C, Schriefer ME, Wozniak E, et al. Diagnosis and Management of Borrelia turicatae Infection in Febrile Soldier, Texas, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):883-884. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.162069
    AMA Christensen AM, Pietralczyk E, Lopez JE, et al. Diagnosis and Management of Borrelia turicatae Infection in Febrile Soldier, Texas, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):883-884. doi:10.3201/eid2305.162069.
    APA Christensen, A. M., Pietralczyk, E., Lopez, J. E., Brooks, C., Schriefer, M. E., Wozniak, E....Stermole, B. (2017). Diagnosis and Management of Borrelia turicatae Infection in Febrile Soldier, Texas, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 883-884. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.162069.
        Email Email this Article
  • Severe MRSA Enterocolitis Caused by a Strain Harboring Enterotoxins D, G, and I PDF Version [PDF - 948 KB - 3 pages]
    M. Bergevin et al.
        View Abstract

    We describe a case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) enterocolitis in a healthy adult with previous antibiotic exposure. Colonoscopy revealed diffuse colitis and mild ileitis without ulceration. Stool cultures demonstrated abundant growth of MRSA and absent normal flora. Oral vancomycin treatment was effective and seems to be the consensus choice for therapy.

        Cite This Article
    EID Bergevin M, Marion A, Farber D, Golding GR, Lévesque S. Severe MRSA Enterocolitis Caused by a Strain Harboring Enterotoxins D, G, and I. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):865-867. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161644
    AMA Bergevin M, Marion A, Farber D, et al. Severe MRSA Enterocolitis Caused by a Strain Harboring Enterotoxins D, G, and I. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):865-867. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161644.
    APA Bergevin, M., Marion, A., Farber, D., Golding, G. R., & Lévesque, S. (2017). Severe MRSA Enterocolitis Caused by a Strain Harboring Enterotoxins D, G, and I. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 865-867. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161644.
        Email Email this Article
  • Reemergence of African Swine Fever in Zimbabwe, 2015 PDF Version [PDF - 396 KB - 2 pages]
    J. van Heerden et al.
        View Abstract

    Zimbabwe is the only country in southern Africa with no reported African swine fever (ASF) outbreaks during 1993–2014. However, the 2015 discovery of genotype II ASF virus in Zimbabwe indicates the reemergence of ASF in this country and suggests that this viral genotype may be spreading through eastern and southern Africa.

        Cite This Article
    EID van Heerden J, Malan K, Gadaga BM, Spargo RM. Reemergence of African Swine Fever in Zimbabwe, 2015. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):860-861. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161195
    AMA van Heerden J, Malan K, Gadaga BM, et al. Reemergence of African Swine Fever in Zimbabwe, 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):860-861. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161195.
    APA van Heerden, J., Malan, K., Gadaga, B. M., & Spargo, R. M. (2017). Reemergence of African Swine Fever in Zimbabwe, 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 860-861. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161195.
        Email Email this Article
  • Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease Vaccine Recommendations at a University, New Jersey, USA, 2016 PDF Version [PDF - 368 KB - 3 pages]
    H. M. Soeters et al.
        View Abstract

    In response to a university-based serogroup B meningococcal disease outbreak, the serogroup B meningococcal vaccine Trumenba was recommended for students, a rare instance in which a specific vaccine brand was recommended. This outbreak highlights the challenges of using molecular and immunologic data to inform real-time response.

        Cite This Article
    EID Soeters HM, Dinitz-Sklar J, Kulkarni PA, MacNeil JR, McNamara LA, Zaremski E, et al. Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease Vaccine Recommendations at a University, New Jersey, USA, 2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):867-869. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161870
    AMA Soeters HM, Dinitz-Sklar J, Kulkarni PA, et al. Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease Vaccine Recommendations at a University, New Jersey, USA, 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):867-869. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161870.
    APA Soeters, H. M., Dinitz-Sklar, J., Kulkarni, P. A., MacNeil, J. R., McNamara, L. A., Zaremski, E....Montana, B. (2017). Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease Vaccine Recommendations at a University, New Jersey, USA, 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 867-869. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161870.
        Email Email this Article
  • Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacter cloacae in Patients from the US Veterans Health Administration, 2006–2015 PDF Version [PDF - 653 KB - 3 pages]
    B. M. Wilson et al.
        View Abstract

    We analyzed carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) trends among patients from the US Veterans Health Administration (VHA). After the emergence of CRE in the eastern United States, resistance rates remained stable in Klebsiella pneumoniae but increased in Enterobacter cloacae complex, suggesting a "second epidemic". VHA offers a vantage point for monitoring nationwide CRE trends.

        Cite This Article
    EID Wilson BM, El Chakhtoura NG, Patel S, Saade E, Donskey CJ, Bonomo RA, et al. Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacter cloacae in Patients from the US Veterans Health Administration, 2006–2015. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):878-880. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.162034
    AMA Wilson BM, El Chakhtoura NG, Patel S, et al. Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacter cloacae in Patients from the US Veterans Health Administration, 2006–2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):878-880. doi:10.3201/eid2305.162034.
    APA Wilson, B. M., El Chakhtoura, N. G., Patel, S., Saade, E., Donskey, C. J., Bonomo, R. A....Perez, F. (2017). Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacter cloacae in Patients from the US Veterans Health Administration, 2006–2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 878-880. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.162034.
        Email Email this Article
  • Zika Virus Infection and Prolonged Viremia in Whole-Blood Specimens PDF Version [PDF - 450 KB - 3 pages]
    J. Mansuy et al.
        View Abstract

    We tested whole-blood and plasma samples from immunocompetent patients who had had benign Zika virus infections and found that Zika virus RNA persisted in whole blood substantially longer than in plasma. This finding may have implications for diagnosis of acute symptomatic and asymptomatic infections and for testing of blood donations.

        Cite This Article
    EID Mansuy J, Mengelle C, Pasquier C, Chapuy-Regaud S, Delobel P, Martin-Blondel G, et al. Zika Virus Infection and Prolonged Viremia in Whole-Blood Specimens. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):863-865. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161631
    AMA Mansuy J, Mengelle C, Pasquier C, et al. Zika Virus Infection and Prolonged Viremia in Whole-Blood Specimens. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):863-865. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161631.
    APA Mansuy, J., Mengelle, C., Pasquier, C., Chapuy-Regaud, S., Delobel, P., Martin-Blondel, G....Izopet, J. (2017). Zika Virus Infection and Prolonged Viremia in Whole-Blood Specimens. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 863-865. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161631.
        Email Email this Article
  • Clinical Manifestations of Punta Toro Virus Species Complex Infections, Panama, 2009 PDF Version [PDF - 821 KB - 3 pages]
    N. D. Gundacker et al.
        View Abstract

    An investigation in Panama found that Punta Toro virus species complex (PTVs) may contribute to febrile illnesses with symptoms mirroring those of dengue fever. However, further studies are needed to determine if PTV infection causes only a mild disease or if it can have more serious manifestations in some patients.

        Cite This Article
    EID Gundacker ND, Carrera J, Castillo M, Díaz Y, Valenzuela J, Tamhane A, et al. Clinical Manifestations of Punta Toro Virus Species Complex Infections, Panama, 2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):872-874. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161925
    AMA Gundacker ND, Carrera J, Castillo M, et al. Clinical Manifestations of Punta Toro Virus Species Complex Infections, Panama, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):872-874. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161925.
    APA Gundacker, N. D., Carrera, J., Castillo, M., Díaz, Y., Valenzuela, J., Tamhane, A....López-Vergès, S. (2017). Clinical Manifestations of Punta Toro Virus Species Complex Infections, Panama, 2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 872-874. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161925.
        Email Email this Article
  • Chromosomal 16S Ribosomal RNA Methyltransferase RmtE1 in Escherichia coli Sequence Type 448 PDF Version [PDF - 341 KB - 3 pages]
    B. Li et al.
        View Abstract

    We identified rmtE1, an uncommon 16S ribosomal methyltransferase gene, in an aminoglycoside- and cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli sequence type 448 clinical strain co-harboring blaCMY-2. Long-read sequencing revealed insertion of a 101,257-bp fragment carrying both resistance genes to the chromosome. Our findings underscore E. coli sequence type 448 as a potential high-risk multidrug-resistant clone.

        Cite This Article
    EID Li B, Pacey MP, Doi Y. Chromosomal 16S Ribosomal RNA Methyltransferase RmtE1 in Escherichia coli Sequence Type 448. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):876-878. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.162000
    AMA Li B, Pacey MP, Doi Y. Chromosomal 16S Ribosomal RNA Methyltransferase RmtE1 in Escherichia coli Sequence Type 448. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):876-878. doi:10.3201/eid2305.162000.
    APA Li, B., Pacey, M. P., & Doi, Y. (2017). Chromosomal 16S Ribosomal RNA Methyltransferase RmtE1 in Escherichia coli Sequence Type 448. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 876-878. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.162000.
        Email Email this Article
  • Vertical Transmission of Zika Virus by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus Mosquitoes PDF Version [PDF - 343 KB - 3 pages]
    A. T. Ciota et al.
        View Abstract

    To determine the potential role of vertical transmission in Zika virus expansion, we evaluated larval pools of perorally infected Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus adult female mosquitoes; ≈1/84 larvae tested were Zika virus–positive; and rates varied among mosquito populations. Thus, vertical transmission may play a role in Zika virus spread and maintenance.

        Cite This Article
    EID Ciota AT, Bialosuknia SM, Ehrbar DJ, Kramer LD. Vertical Transmission of Zika Virus by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus Mosquitoes. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):880-882. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.162041
    AMA Ciota AT, Bialosuknia SM, Ehrbar DJ, et al. Vertical Transmission of Zika Virus by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus Mosquitoes. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):880-882. doi:10.3201/eid2305.162041.
    APA Ciota, A. T., Bialosuknia, S. M., Ehrbar, D. J., & Kramer, L. D. (2017). Vertical Transmission of Zika Virus by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus Mosquitoes. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 880-882. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.162041.
        Email Email this Article
  • No Such Thing as Chronic Q Fever PDF Version [PDF - 303 KB - 2 pages]
    M. Million and D. Raoult
        View Abstract

    Modern diagnostic methods enable clinicians to look beyond a diagnosis of chronic Q fever and discern whether patients instead have persistent focalized Coxiella burnetii infection(s). Use of these methods and development of criteria to define and treat such infections, especially cardiovascular infections, will improve the prognosis for patients previously thought to have chronic Q fever.

        Cite This Article
    EID Million M, Raoult D. No Such Thing as Chronic Q Fever. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):856-857. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.151159
    AMA Million M, Raoult D. No Such Thing as Chronic Q Fever. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):856-857. doi:10.3201/eid2305.151159.
    APA Million, M., & Raoult, D. (2017). No Such Thing as Chronic Q Fever. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 856-857. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.151159.
        Email Email this Article
  • ESBL- and Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Patients with Bacteremia, Yangon, Myanmar, 2014 PDF Version [PDF - 348 KB - 3 pages]
    T. O. Myat et al.
        View Abstract

    Among 42 gram-negative bloodstream isolates from inpatients in 3 hospitals in Yangon, Myanmar, admitted during July–December 2014, 16 (38%) were extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing Enterobacteriaceae and 6 (14%) produced carbapenemase. The high prevalence of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria raises concerns about the empiric treatment of patients with sepsis in Yangon.

        Cite This Article
    EID Myat TO, Hannaway RF, Zin KN, Htike WW, Win KK, Crump JA, et al. ESBL- and Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Patients with Bacteremia, Yangon, Myanmar, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):857-859. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161100
    AMA Myat TO, Hannaway RF, Zin KN, et al. ESBL- and Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Patients with Bacteremia, Yangon, Myanmar, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):857-859. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161100.
    APA Myat, T. O., Hannaway, R. F., Zin, K. N., Htike, W. W., Win, K. K., Crump, J. A....Ussher, J. E. (2017). ESBL- and Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Patients with Bacteremia, Yangon, Myanmar, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 857-859. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161100.
        Email Email this Article
  • Meningococci of Serogroup X Clonal Complex 181 in Refugee Camps, Italy PDF Version [PDF - 673 KB - 3 pages]
    P. Stefanelli et al.
        View Abstract

    Four cases of infection with serogroup X meningococci (MenX) (1 in 2015 and 3 in 2016) occurred in migrants living in refugee camps or reception centers in Italy. All MenX isolates were identified as clonal complex 181. Our report suggests that serogroup X represents an emerging health threat for persons arriving from African countries.

        Cite This Article
    EID Stefanelli P, Neri A, Vacca P, Picicco D, Daprai L, Mainardi G, et al. Meningococci of Serogroup X Clonal Complex 181 in Refugee Camps, Italy. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):870-872. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161713
    AMA Stefanelli P, Neri A, Vacca P, et al. Meningococci of Serogroup X Clonal Complex 181 in Refugee Camps, Italy. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):870-872. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161713.
    APA Stefanelli, P., Neri, A., Vacca, P., Picicco, D., Daprai, L., Mainardi, G....Fazio, C. (2017). Meningococci of Serogroup X Clonal Complex 181 in Refugee Camps, Italy. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 870-872. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161713.
        Email Email this Article

Letters

  • CTX-M-27–Producing Escherichia coli of Sequence Type 131 and Clade C1-M27, France PDF Version [PDF - 311 KB - 1 page]
    A. Birgy et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Birgy A, Bidet P, Levy C, Sobral E, Cohen R, Bonacorsi S, et al. CTX-M-27–Producing Escherichia coli of Sequence Type 131 and Clade C1-M27, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):885. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161865
    AMA Birgy A, Bidet P, Levy C, et al. CTX-M-27–Producing Escherichia coli of Sequence Type 131 and Clade C1-M27, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):885. doi:10.3201/eid2305.161865.
    APA Birgy, A., Bidet, P., Levy, C., Sobral, E., Cohen, R., & Bonacorsi, S. (2017). CTX-M-27–Producing Escherichia coli of Sequence Type 131 and Clade C1-M27, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 885. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.161865.
        Email Email this Article
  • Antimicrobial Drug Resistance among Refugees from Syria, Jordan PDF Version [PDF - 1.05 MB]
    A. Abbara et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Abbara A, Al-Harbat N, Karah N, Abo-Yahya B, El-Amin W, Hatcher J, et al. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance among Refugees from Syria, Jordan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):885-886. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.170117
    AMA Abbara A, Al-Harbat N, Karah N, et al. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance among Refugees from Syria, Jordan. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):885-886. doi:10.3201/eid2305.170117.
    APA Abbara, A., Al-Harbat, N., Karah, N., Abo-Yahya, B., El-Amin, W., Hatcher, J....Gabbar, O. (2017). Antimicrobial Drug Resistance among Refugees from Syria, Jordan. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 885-886. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.170117.
        Email Email this Article

About the Cover

  • Naïve Arrogance and Vulnerability PDF Version [PDF - 1.60 MB - 2 pages]
    B. Breedlove and P. M. Arguin
            Cite This Article
    EID Breedlove B, Arguin PM. Naïve Arrogance and Vulnerability. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(5):887-888. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.AC2305
    AMA Breedlove B, Arguin PM. Naïve Arrogance and Vulnerability. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(5):887-888. doi:10.3201/eid2305.AC2305.
    APA Breedlove, B., & Arguin, P. M. (2017). Naïve Arrogance and Vulnerability. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(5), 887-888. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2305.AC2305.
        Email Email this Article

Etymologia

Online Reports

  • Translation of Real-Time Infectious Disease Modeling into Routine Public Health Practice PDF Version [PDF - 310 KB - 6 pages]
    D. J. Muscatello et al.
        View Abstract

    Infectious disease dynamic modeling can support outbreak emergency responses. We conducted a workshop to canvas the needs of stakeholders in Australia for practical, real-time modeling tools for infectious disease emergencies. The workshop was attended by 29 participants who represented government, defense, general practice, and academia stakeholders. We found that modeling is underused in Australia and its potential is poorly understood by practitioners involved in epidemic responses. The development of better modeling tools is desired. Ideal modeling tools for operational use would be easy to use, clearly indicate underlying parameterization and assumptions, and assist with policy and decision making.

            Email Email this Article

Corrections

TOP