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Emerging Infectious Diseases journal

Synopses

  • Medscape CME Activity
    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in 2 Plasma Product Recipients, United Kingdom PDF Version [PDF - 1.27 MB - 5 pages]
    P. Urwin et al.
    View Summary

    Two cases of sporadic CJD with clotting disorders have been identified, but this may represent a chance event.

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    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) has not been previously reported in patients with clotting disorders treated with fractionated plasma products. We report 2 cases of sCJD identified in the United Kingdom in patients with a history of extended treatment for clotting disorders; 1 patient had hemophilia B and the other von Willebrand disease. Both patients had been informed previously that they were at increased risk for variant CJD because of past treatment with fractionated plasma products sourced in the United Kingdom. However, both cases had clinical and investigative features suggestive of sCJD. This diagnosis was confirmed in both cases on neuropathologic and biochemical analysis of the brain. A causal link between the treatment with plasma products and the development of sCJD has not been established, and the occurrence of these cases may simply reflect a chance event in the context of systematic surveillance for CJD in large populations.

        Cite This Article
    EID Urwin P, Thanigaikumar K, Ironside JW, Molesworth A, Knight RS, Hewitt PE, et al. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in 2 Plasma Product Recipients, United Kingdom. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):893-897. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161884
    AMA Urwin P, Thanigaikumar K, Ironside JW, et al. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in 2 Plasma Product Recipients, United Kingdom. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):893-897. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161884.
    APA Urwin, P., Thanigaikumar, K., Ironside, J. W., Molesworth, A., Knight, R. S., Hewitt, P. E....Will, R. G. (2017). Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in 2 Plasma Product Recipients, United Kingdom. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 893-897. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161884.
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Research

  • Hospital Outbreaks of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, Daejeon, South Korea, 2015 PDF Version [PDF - 1.76 MB - 8 pages]
    J. Park et al.
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    From May through July 2015, a total of 26 cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome were reported from 2 hospitals in Daejeon, South Korea, including 1 index case and 25 new cases. We examined the epidemiologic features of these cases and found an estimated median incubation period of 6.1 days (8.8 days in hospital A and 4.6 days in hospital B). The overall attack rate was 3.7% (4.7% in hospital A and 3.0% in hospital B), and the attack rates among inpatients and caregivers in the same ward were 12.3% and 22.5%, respectively. The overall case-fatality rate was 44.0% (28.6% in hospital A and 63.6% in hospital B). The use of cohort quarantine may have played a role in preventing community spread, but additional transmission occurred among members of the hospital cohort quarantined together. Caregivers may have contributed in part to the transmission.

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    EID Park J, Lee K, Lee K, Lee S, Cho J, Mo J, et al. Hospital Outbreaks of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, Daejeon, South Korea, 2015. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):898-905. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.160120
    AMA Park J, Lee K, Lee K, et al. Hospital Outbreaks of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, Daejeon, South Korea, 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):898-905. doi:10.3201/eid2306.160120.
    APA Park, J., Lee, K., Lee, K., Lee, S., Cho, J., Mo, J....Nam, H. (2017). Hospital Outbreaks of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, Daejeon, South Korea, 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 898-905. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.160120.
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  • Genomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT160 Associated with a 14-Year Outbreak, New Zealand, 1998–2012 PDF Version [PDF - 1.69 MB - 8 pages]
    S. J. Bloomfield et al.
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    During 1998–2012, an extended outbreak of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive type 160 (DT160) affected >3,000 humans and killed wild birds in New Zealand. However, the relationship between DT160 within these 2 host groups and the origin of the outbreak are unknown. Whole-genome sequencing was used to compare 109 Salmonella Typhimurium DT160 isolates from sources throughout New Zealand. We provide evidence that DT160 was introduced into New Zealand around 1997 and rapidly propagated throughout the country, becoming more genetically diverse over time. The genetic heterogeneity was evenly distributed across multiple predicted functional protein groups, and we found no evidence of host group differentiation between isolates collected from human, poultry, bovid, and wild bird sources, indicating ongoing transmission between these host groups. Our findings demonstrate how a comparative genomic approach can be used to gain insight into outbreaks, disease transmission, and the evolution of a multihost pathogen after a probable point-source introduction.

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    EID Bloomfield SJ, Benschop J, Biggs PJ, Marshall JC, Hayman D, Carter PE, et al. Genomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT160 Associated with a 14-Year Outbreak, New Zealand, 1998–2012. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):906-913. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161934
    AMA Bloomfield SJ, Benschop J, Biggs PJ, et al. Genomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT160 Associated with a 14-Year Outbreak, New Zealand, 1998–2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):906-913. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161934.
    APA Bloomfield, S. J., Benschop, J., Biggs, P. J., Marshall, J. C., Hayman, D., Carter, P. E....French, N. P. (2017). Genomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT160 Associated with a 14-Year Outbreak, New Zealand, 1998–2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 906-913. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161934.
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  • Stockpiling Ventilators for Influenza Pandemics PDF Version [PDF - 1018 KB - 8 pages]
    H. Huang et al.
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    In preparing for influenza pandemics, public health agencies stockpile critical medical resources. Determining appropriate quantities and locations for such resources can be challenging, given the considerable uncertainty in the timing and severity of future pandemics. We introduce a method for optimizing stockpiles of mechanical ventilators, which are critical for treating hospitalized influenza patients in respiratory failure. As a case study, we consider the US state of Texas during mild, moderate, and severe pandemics. Optimal allocations prioritize local over central storage, even though the latter can be deployed adaptively, on the basis of real-time needs. This prioritization stems from high geographic correlations and the slightly lower treatment success assumed for centrally stockpiled ventilators. We developed our model and analysis in collaboration with academic researchers and a state public health agency and incorporated it into a Web-based decision-support tool for pandemic preparedness and response.

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    EID Huang H, Araz OM, Morton DP, Johnson GP, Damien P, Clements B, et al. Stockpiling Ventilators for Influenza Pandemics. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):914-921. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161417
    AMA Huang H, Araz OM, Morton DP, et al. Stockpiling Ventilators for Influenza Pandemics. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):914-921. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161417.
    APA Huang, H., Araz, O. M., Morton, D. P., Johnson, G. P., Damien, P., Clements, B....Meyers, L. (2017). Stockpiling Ventilators for Influenza Pandemics. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 914-921. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161417.
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  • Invasive Serotype 35B Pneumococci Including an Expanding Serotype Switch Lineage, United States, 2015–2016 PDF Version [PDF - 1.28 MB - 9 pages]
    S. Chochua et al.
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    We used whole-genome sequencing to characterize 199 nonvaccine serotype 35B pneumococcal strains that caused invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the United States during 2015–2016 and related these findings to previous serotype 35B IPD data obtained by Active Bacterial Core surveillance. Penicillin-nonsusceptible 35B IPD increased during post–pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine years (2001–2009) and increased further after implementation of pneumococcal 13-valent conjugate vaccine in 2010. This increase was caused primarily by the 35B/sequence type (ST) 558 lineage. 35B/ST558 and vaccine serotype 9V/ST156 lineages were implicated as cps35B donor and recipient, respectively, for a single capsular switch event that generated emergent 35B/ST156 progeny in 6 states during 2015–2016. Three additional capsular switch 35B variants were identified, 2 of which also involved 35B/ST558 as cps35B donor. Spread of 35B/ST156 is of concern in view of past global predominance of pathogenic ST156 vaccine serotype strains. Protection against serotype 35B should be considered in next-generation pneumococcal vaccines.

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    EID Chochua S, Metcalf BJ, Li Z, Walker H, Tran T, McGee L, et al. Invasive Serotype 35B Pneumococci Including an Expanding Serotype Switch Lineage, United States, 2015–2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):922-930. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.170071
    AMA Chochua S, Metcalf BJ, Li Z, et al. Invasive Serotype 35B Pneumococci Including an Expanding Serotype Switch Lineage, United States, 2015–2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):922-930. doi:10.3201/eid2306.170071.
    APA Chochua, S., Metcalf, B. J., Li, Z., Walker, H., Tran, T., McGee, L....Beall, B. (2017). Invasive Serotype 35B Pneumococci Including an Expanding Serotype Switch Lineage, United States, 2015–2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 922-930. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.170071.
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  • Serologic and Molecular Evidence of Vaccinia Virus Circulation among Small Mammals from Different Biomes, Brazil PDF Version [PDF - 3.32 MB - 8 pages]
    J. B. Miranda et al.
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    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a zoonotic agent that causes a disease called bovine vaccinia, which is detected mainly in milking cattle and humans in close contact with these animals. Even though many aspects of VACV infection have been described, much is still unknown about its circulation in the environment and its natural hosts/reservoirs. To investigate the presence of Orthopoxvirus antibodies or VACV DNA, we captured small rodents and marsupials in 3 areas of Minas Gerais state, Brazil, and tested their samples in a laboratory. A total of 336 animals were tested; positivity ranged from 18.1% to 25.5% in the 3 studied regions located in different biomes, including the Atlantic Forest and the Cerrado. Analysis of nucleotide sequences indicated co-circulation of VACV groups I and II. Our findings reinforce the possible role played by rodents and marsupials in VACV maintenance and its transmission chain.

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    EID Miranda JB, Borges IA, Campos S, Vieira FN, de Ázara T, Marques FA, et al. Serologic and Molecular Evidence of Vaccinia Virus Circulation among Small Mammals from Different Biomes, Brazil. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):931-938. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161643
    AMA Miranda JB, Borges IA, Campos S, et al. Serologic and Molecular Evidence of Vaccinia Virus Circulation among Small Mammals from Different Biomes, Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):931-938. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161643.
    APA Miranda, J. B., Borges, I. A., Campos, S., Vieira, F. N., de Ázara, T., Marques, F. A....Trindade, G. S. (2017). Serologic and Molecular Evidence of Vaccinia Virus Circulation among Small Mammals from Different Biomes, Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 931-938. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161643.
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  • Medscape CME Activity
    Relative Risk for Ehrlichiosis and Lyme Disease in an Area Where Vectors for Both Are Sympatric, New Jersey, USA PDF Version [PDF - 647 KB - 7 pages]
    A. Egizi et al.
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    Vector tick infection and encounter rates suggest gross underreporting or misreporting of ehrlichiosis in the northeast United States.

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    The lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum, is a vector of Ehrlichia chaffeensis and E. ewingii, causal agents of human ehrlichiosis, and has demonstrated marked geographic expansion in recent years. A. americanum ticks often outnumber the vector of Lyme disease, Ixodes scapularis, where both ticks are sympatric, yet cases of Lyme disease far exceed ehrlichiosis cases. We quantified the risk for ehrlichiosis relative to Lyme disease by using relative tick encounter frequencies and infection rates for these 2 species in Monmouth County, New Jersey, USA. Our calculations predict >1 ehrlichiosis case for every 2 Lyme disease cases, >2 orders of magnitude higher than current case rates (e.g., 2 ehrlichiosis versus 439 Lyme disease cases in 2014). This result implies ehrlichiosis is grossly underreported (or misreported) or that many infections are asymptomatic. We recommend expansion of tickborne disease education in the Northeast United States to include human health risks posed by A. americanum ticks.

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    EID Egizi A, Fefferman NH, Jordan RA. Relative Risk for Ehrlichiosis and Lyme Disease in an Area Where Vectors for Both Are Sympatric, New Jersey, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):939-945. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.160528
    AMA Egizi A, Fefferman NH, Jordan RA. Relative Risk for Ehrlichiosis and Lyme Disease in an Area Where Vectors for Both Are Sympatric, New Jersey, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):939-945. doi:10.3201/eid2306.160528.
    APA Egizi, A., Fefferman, N. H., & Jordan, R. A. (2017). Relative Risk for Ehrlichiosis and Lyme Disease in an Area Where Vectors for Both Are Sympatric, New Jersey, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 939-945. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.160528.
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  • Distribution and Quantitative Estimates of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Prions in Tissues of Clinical and Asymptomatic Patients PDF Version [PDF - 1.78 MB - 11 pages]
    J. Y. Douet et al.
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    In the United-Kingdom, ≈1 of 2,000 persons could be infected with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). Therefore, risk of transmission of vCJD by medical procedures remains a major concern for public health authorities. In this study, we used in vitro amplification of prions by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) to estimate distribution and level of the vCJD agent in 21 tissues from 4 patients who died of clinical vCJD and from 1 asymptomatic person with vCJD. PMCA identified major levels of vCJD prions in a range of tissues, including liver, salivary gland, kidney, lung, and bone marrow. Bioassays confirmed that the quantitative estimate of levels of vCJD prion accumulation provided by PMCA are indicative of vCJD infectivity levels in tissues. Findings provide critical data for the design of measures to minimize risk for iatrogenic transmission of vCJD.

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    EID Douet JY, Lacroux C, Aron N, Head MW, Lugan S, Tillier C, et al. Distribution and Quantitative Estimates of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Prions in Tissues of Clinical and Asymptomatic Patients. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):946-956. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161734
    AMA Douet JY, Lacroux C, Aron N, et al. Distribution and Quantitative Estimates of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Prions in Tissues of Clinical and Asymptomatic Patients. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):946-956. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161734.
    APA Douet, J. Y., Lacroux, C., Aron, N., Head, M. W., Lugan, S., Tillier, C....Andréoletti, O. (2017). Distribution and Quantitative Estimates of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Prions in Tissues of Clinical and Asymptomatic Patients. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 946-956. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161734.
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  • Outbreak-Related Disease Burden Associated with Consumption of Unpasteurized Cow’s Milk and Cheese, United States, 2009–2014 PDF Version [PDF - 951 KB - 8 pages]
    S. Costard et al.
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    The growing popularity of unpasteurized milk in the United States raises public health concerns. We estimated outbreak-related illnesses and hospitalizations caused by the consumption of cow’s milk and cheese contaminated with Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Campylobacter spp. using a model relying on publicly available outbreak data. In the United States, outbreaks associated with dairy consumption cause, on average, 760 illnesses/year and 22 hospitalizations/year, mostly from Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. Unpasteurized milk, consumed by only 3.2% of the population, and cheese, consumed by only 1.6% of the population, caused 96% of illnesses caused by contaminated dairy products. Unpasteurized dairy products thus cause 840 (95% CrI 611–1,158) times more illnesses and 45 (95% CrI 34–59) times more hospitalizations than pasteurized products. As consumption of unpasteurized dairy products grows, illnesses will increase steadily; a doubling in the consumption of unpasteurized milk or cheese could increase outbreak-related illnesses by 96%.

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    EID Costard S, Espejo L, Groenendaal H, Zagmutt FJ. Outbreak-Related Disease Burden Associated with Consumption of Unpasteurized Cow’s Milk and Cheese, United States, 2009–2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):957-964. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.151603
    AMA Costard S, Espejo L, Groenendaal H, et al. Outbreak-Related Disease Burden Associated with Consumption of Unpasteurized Cow’s Milk and Cheese, United States, 2009–2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):957-964. doi:10.3201/eid2306.151603.
    APA Costard, S., Espejo, L., Groenendaal, H., & Zagmutt, F. J. (2017). Outbreak-Related Disease Burden Associated with Consumption of Unpasteurized Cow’s Milk and Cheese, United States, 2009–2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 957-964. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.151603.
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Dispatches

  • Sustainability of High-Level Isolation Capabilities among US Ebola Treatment Centers PDF Version [PDF - 467 KB - 3 pages]
    J. J. Herstein et al.
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    To identify barriers to maintaining and applying capabilities of US high-level isolation units (HLIUs) used during the Ebola virus disease outbreak, during 2016 we surveyed HLIUs. HLIUs identified sustainability challenges and reported the highly infectious diseases they would treat. HLIUs expended substantial resources in development but must strategize models of sustainability to maintain readiness.

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    EID Herstein JJ, Biddinger PD, Gibbs SG, Le AB, Jelden KC, Hewlett AL, et al. Sustainability of High-Level Isolation Capabilities among US Ebola Treatment Centers. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):965-967. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.170062
    AMA Herstein JJ, Biddinger PD, Gibbs SG, et al. Sustainability of High-Level Isolation Capabilities among US Ebola Treatment Centers. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):965-967. doi:10.3201/eid2306.170062.
    APA Herstein, J. J., Biddinger, P. D., Gibbs, S. G., Le, A. B., Jelden, K. C., Hewlett, A. L....Lowe, J. J. (2017). Sustainability of High-Level Isolation Capabilities among US Ebola Treatment Centers. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 965-967. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.170062.
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  • Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Human Rotavirus G8P[8] Outbreak Strain, Japan, 2014 PDF Version [PDF - 1.32 MB - 5 pages]
    K. Kondo et al.
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    During March–July 2014, rotavirus G8P[8] emerged as the predominant cause of rotavirus gastroenteritis among children in Hokkaido Prefecture, Japan. Clinical characteristics were similar for infections caused by G8 and non-G8 strains. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses suggest the strains were generated by multiple reassortment events between DS-1–like P[8] strains and bovine strains from Asia.

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    EID Kondo K, Tsugawa T, Ono M, Ohara T, Fujibayashi S, Tahara Y, et al. Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Human Rotavirus G8P[8] Outbreak Strain, Japan, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):968-972. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.160038
    AMA Kondo K, Tsugawa T, Ono M, et al. Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Human Rotavirus G8P[8] Outbreak Strain, Japan, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):968-972. doi:10.3201/eid2306.160038.
    APA Kondo, K., Tsugawa, T., Ono, M., Ohara, T., Fujibayashi, S., Tahara, Y....Tsutsumi, H. (2017). Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Human Rotavirus G8P[8] Outbreak Strain, Japan, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 968-972. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.160038.
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  • Seoul Virus Infection in Humans, France, 2014–2016 PDF Version [PDF - 1.92 MB - 5 pages]
    J. Reynes et al.
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    We report detection of Seoul virus in 3 patients in France over a 2-year period. These patients accounted for 3 of the 4 Seoul virus infections among 434 hantavirus infections (1.7%) reported during this time. More attention should be given to this virus in Europe where surveillance has been focused mostly on Puumala and Dobrava-Belgrade hantaviruses.

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    EID Reynes J, Carli D, Bour J, Boudjeltia S, Dewilde A, Gerbier G, et al. Seoul Virus Infection in Humans, France, 2014–2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):973-977. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.160927
    AMA Reynes J, Carli D, Bour J, et al. Seoul Virus Infection in Humans, France, 2014–2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):973-977. doi:10.3201/eid2306.160927.
    APA Reynes, J., Carli, D., Bour, J., Boudjeltia, S., Dewilde, A., Gerbier, G....Septfons, A. (2017). Seoul Virus Infection in Humans, France, 2014–2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 973-977. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.160927.
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  • Central Nervous System Brucellosis Granuloma and White Matter Disease in Immunocompromised Patient PDF Version [PDF - 2.45 MB - 4 pages]
    M. Alqwaifly et al.
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    Brucellosis is a multisystem zoonotic disease. We report an unusual case of neurobrucellosis with seizures in an immunocompromised patient in Saudi Arabia who underwent renal transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed diffuse white matter lesions. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid were positive for Brucella sp. Granuloma was detected in a brain biopsy specimen.

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    EID Alqwaifly M, Al-Ajlan FS, Al-Hindi H, Al Semari A. Central Nervous System Brucellosis Granuloma and White Matter Disease in Immunocompromised Patient. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):978-981. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161173
    AMA Alqwaifly M, Al-Ajlan FS, Al-Hindi H, et al. Central Nervous System Brucellosis Granuloma and White Matter Disease in Immunocompromised Patient. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):978-981. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161173.
    APA Alqwaifly, M., Al-Ajlan, F. S., Al-Hindi, H., & Al Semari, A. (2017). Central Nervous System Brucellosis Granuloma and White Matter Disease in Immunocompromised Patient. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 978-981. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161173.
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  • Severe Neurologic Disorders in 2 Fetuses with Zika Virus Infection, Colombia PDF Version [PDF - 1.51 MB - 3 pages]
    J. Acosta-Reyes et al.
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    We report the results of pathologic examinations of 2 fetuses from women in Colombia with Zika virus infection during pregnancy that revealed severe central nervous system defects and potential associated abnormalities of the eye, spleen, and placenta. Amniotic fluid and tissues from multiple fetal organs tested positive for Zika virus.

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    EID Acosta-Reyes J, Navarro E, Herrera M, Goenaga E, Ospina ML, Parra E, et al. Severe Neurologic Disorders in 2 Fetuses with Zika Virus Infection, Colombia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):982-984. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161702
    AMA Acosta-Reyes J, Navarro E, Herrera M, et al. Severe Neurologic Disorders in 2 Fetuses with Zika Virus Infection, Colombia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):982-984. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161702.
    APA Acosta-Reyes, J., Navarro, E., Herrera, M., Goenaga, E., Ospina, M. L., Parra, E....Baquero, H. (2017). Severe Neurologic Disorders in 2 Fetuses with Zika Virus Infection, Colombia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 982-984. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161702.
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  • Domestic Pig Unlikely Reservoir for MERS-CoV PDF Version [PDF - 2.14 MB - 4 pages]
    E. de Wit et al.
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    We tested the suitability of the domestic pig as a model for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection. Inoculation did not cause disease, but a low level of virus replication, shedding, and seroconversion were observed. Pigs do not recapitulate human MERS-CoV and are unlikely to constitute a reservoir in nature.

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    EID de Wit E, Feldmann F, Horne E, Martellaro C, Haddock E, Bushmaker T, et al. Domestic Pig Unlikely Reservoir for MERS-CoV. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):985-988. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.170096
    AMA de Wit E, Feldmann F, Horne E, et al. Domestic Pig Unlikely Reservoir for MERS-CoV. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):985-988. doi:10.3201/eid2306.170096.
    APA de Wit, E., Feldmann, F., Horne, E., Martellaro, C., Haddock, E., Bushmaker, T....Feldmann, H. (2017). Domestic Pig Unlikely Reservoir for MERS-CoV. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 985-988. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.170096.
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  • High Rates of Neutralizing Antibodies to Toscana and Sandfly Fever Sicilian Viruses in Livestock, Kosovo PDF Version [PDF - 1.27 MB - 4 pages]
    N. Ayhan et al.
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    Toscana and sandfly fever Sicilian viruses (TOSV and SFSV, respectively), both transmitted by sand flies, are prominent human pathogens in the Old World. Of 1,086 serum samples collected from cattle and sheep during 2013 in various regions of Kosovo (Balkan Peninsula), 4.7% and 53.4% had neutralizing antibodies against TOSV and SFSV, respectively.

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    EID Ayhan N, Sherifi K, Taraku A, Bërxholi K, Charrel RN. High Rates of Neutralizing Antibodies to Toscana and Sandfly Fever Sicilian Viruses in Livestock, Kosovo. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):989-992. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161929
    AMA Ayhan N, Sherifi K, Taraku A, et al. High Rates of Neutralizing Antibodies to Toscana and Sandfly Fever Sicilian Viruses in Livestock, Kosovo. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):989-992. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161929.
    APA Ayhan, N., Sherifi, K., Taraku, A., Bërxholi, K., & Charrel, R. N. (2017). High Rates of Neutralizing Antibodies to Toscana and Sandfly Fever Sicilian Viruses in Livestock, Kosovo. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 989-992. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161929.
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  • Congenital Malformations of Calves Infected with Shamonda Virus, Southern Japan PDF Version [PDF - 1.41 MB - 4 pages]
    Y. Hirashima et al.
        View Abstract

    In 2015 and 2016, we observed 15 malformed calves that were exposed to intrauterine infection with Shamonda virus, a Simbu serogroup orthobunyavirus, in Japan. Characteristic manifestations were arthrogryposis and gross lesions in the central nervous system. Our results indicate that this arbovirus should be considered a teratogenic virus in ruminants.

        Cite This Article
    EID Hirashima Y, Kitahara S, Kato T, Shirafuji H, Tanaka S, Yanase T, et al. Congenital Malformations of Calves Infected with Shamonda Virus, Southern Japan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):993-996. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161946
    AMA Hirashima Y, Kitahara S, Kato T, et al. Congenital Malformations of Calves Infected with Shamonda Virus, Southern Japan. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):993-996. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161946.
    APA Hirashima, Y., Kitahara, S., Kato, T., Shirafuji, H., Tanaka, S., & Yanase, T. (2017). Congenital Malformations of Calves Infected with Shamonda Virus, Southern Japan. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 993-996. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161946.
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  • Brucella neotomae Infection in Humans, Costa Rica PDF Version [PDF - 2.85 MB - 4 pages]
    M. Suárez-Esquivel et al.
        View Abstract

    Several species of Brucella are known to be zoonotic, but B. neotomae infection has been thought to be limited to wood rats. In 2008 and 2011, however, B. neotomae was isolated from cerebrospinal fluid of 2 men with neurobrucellosis. The nonzoonotic status of B. neotomae should be reassessed.

        Cite This Article
    EID Suárez-Esquivel M, Ruiz-Villalobos N, Jiménez-Rojas C, Barquero-Calvo E, Chacón-Díaz C, Víquez-Ruiz E, et al. Brucella neotomae Infection in Humans, Costa Rica. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):997-1000. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.162018
    AMA Suárez-Esquivel M, Ruiz-Villalobos N, Jiménez-Rojas C, et al. Brucella neotomae Infection in Humans, Costa Rica. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):997-1000. doi:10.3201/eid2306.162018.
    APA Suárez-Esquivel, M., Ruiz-Villalobos, N., Jiménez-Rojas, C., Barquero-Calvo, E., Chacón-Díaz, C., Víquez-Ruiz, E....Guzmán-Verri, C. (2017). Brucella neotomae Infection in Humans, Costa Rica. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 997-1000. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.162018.
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  • Isolated Case of Marburg Virus Disease, Kampala, Uganda, 2014 PDF Version [PDF - 2.71 MB - 4 pages]
    L. Nyakarahuka et al.
        View Abstract

    In September 2014, a single fatal case of Marburg virus was identified in a healthcare worker in Kampala, Uganda. The source of infection was not identified, and no secondary cases were identified. We describe the rapid identification, laboratory diagnosis, and case investigation of the third Marburg virus outbreak in Uganda.

        Cite This Article
    EID Nyakarahuka L, Ojwang J, Tumusiime A, Balinandi S, Whitmer S, Kyazze S, et al. Isolated Case of Marburg Virus Disease, Kampala, Uganda, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1001-1004. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.170047
    AMA Nyakarahuka L, Ojwang J, Tumusiime A, et al. Isolated Case of Marburg Virus Disease, Kampala, Uganda, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1001-1004. doi:10.3201/eid2306.170047.
    APA Nyakarahuka, L., Ojwang, J., Tumusiime, A., Balinandi, S., Whitmer, S., Kyazze, S....Shoemaker, T. R. (2017). Isolated Case of Marburg Virus Disease, Kampala, Uganda, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1001-1004. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.170047.
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  • Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in Migrant Worker Returning from Oman to India, 2016 PDF Version [PDF - 953 KB - 4 pages]
    P. D. Yadav et al.
        View Abstract

    In January 2016, a migrant worker who returned home to India after becoming ill in Oman was confirmed to have Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF). Physicians should include CCHF in the differential diagnosis for patients with hemorrhagic signs and a history of recent travel to any area where CCHF is endemic or prevalent.

        Cite This Article
    EID Yadav PD, Thacker S, Patil DY, Jain R, Mourya DT. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in Migrant Worker Returning from Oman to India, 2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1005-1008. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161950
    AMA Yadav PD, Thacker S, Patil DY, et al. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in Migrant Worker Returning from Oman to India, 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1005-1008. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161950.
    APA Yadav, P. D., Thacker, S., Patil, D. Y., Jain, R., & Mourya, D. T. (2017). Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in Migrant Worker Returning from Oman to India, 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1005-1008. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161950.
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  • Rise in Group W Meningococcal Carriage in University Students, United Kingdom PDF Version [PDF - 1.89 MB - 3 pages]
    N. J. Oldfield et al.
        View Abstract

    MenACWY conjugate vaccination was recently introduced in the United Kingdom for adolescents and young adults to reduce disease from infection by Neisseria meningitidis group W. We conducted a cross-sectional meningococcal carriage study in first-year UK university students. Despite 71% MenACWY vaccine coverage, carriage of group W increased substantially.

        Cite This Article
    EID Oldfield NJ, Cayrou C, AlJannat M, Al-Rubaiawi A, Green LR, Dada S, et al. Rise in Group W Meningococcal Carriage in University Students, United Kingdom. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1009-1011. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161768
    AMA Oldfield NJ, Cayrou C, AlJannat M, et al. Rise in Group W Meningococcal Carriage in University Students, United Kingdom. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1009-1011. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161768.
    APA Oldfield, N. J., Cayrou, C., AlJannat, M., Al-Rubaiawi, A., Green, L. R., Dada, S....Turner, D. (2017). Rise in Group W Meningococcal Carriage in University Students, United Kingdom. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1009-1011. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161768.
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  • Penicillin Resistance of Nonvaccine Type Pneumococcus before and after PCV13 Introduction, United States PDF Version [PDF - 1.50 MB - 4 pages]
    C. P. Andam et al.
        View Abstract

    Introduction of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the United States was not associated with a significant change in prevalence of penicillin resistance in nonvaccine type serotypes because of the variable success of highly resistant serotypes. Differences in regional serotype distribution and serotype-specific resistance contributed to geographic heterogeneity of penicillin resistance.

        Cite This Article
    EID Andam CP, Worby CJ, Gierke R, McGee L, Pilishvili T, Hanage WP, et al. Penicillin Resistance of Nonvaccine Type Pneumococcus before and after PCV13 Introduction, United States. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1012-1015. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161331
    AMA Andam CP, Worby CJ, Gierke R, et al. Penicillin Resistance of Nonvaccine Type Pneumococcus before and after PCV13 Introduction, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1012-1015. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161331.
    APA Andam, C. P., Worby, C. J., Gierke, R., McGee, L., Pilishvili, T., & Hanage, W. P. (2017). Penicillin Resistance of Nonvaccine Type Pneumococcus before and after PCV13 Introduction, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1012-1015. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161331.
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  • Febrile Respiratory Illness Associated with Human Adenovirus Type 55 in South Korea Military, 2014–2016 PDF Version [PDF - 2.93 MB - 5 pages]
    H. Yoo et al.
        View Abstract

    An outbreak of febrile respiratory illness associated with human adenovirus (HAdV) occurred in the South Korea military during the 2014–15 influenza season and thereafter. Molecular typing and phylogenetic analysis of patient samples identified HAdV type 55 as the causative agent. Emergence of this novel HAdV necessitates continued surveillance in military and civilian populations.

        Cite This Article
    EID Yoo H, Gu S, Jung J, Song D, Yoon C, Hong D, et al. Febrile Respiratory Illness Associated with Human Adenovirus Type 55 in South Korea Military, 2014–2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1016-1020. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161848
    AMA Yoo H, Gu S, Jung J, et al. Febrile Respiratory Illness Associated with Human Adenovirus Type 55 in South Korea Military, 2014–2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1016-1020. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161848.
    APA Yoo, H., Gu, S., Jung, J., Song, D., Yoon, C., Hong, D....Huh, K. (2017). Febrile Respiratory Illness Associated with Human Adenovirus Type 55 in South Korea Military, 2014–2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1016-1020. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161848.
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Commentaries

  • Stockpiling Ventilators for Influenza Pandemics PDF Version [PDF - 1.25 MB - 2 pages]
    M. I. Meltzer and A. Patel
            Cite This Article
    EID Meltzer MI, Patel A. Stockpiling Ventilators for Influenza Pandemics. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1021-1022. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.170434
    AMA Meltzer MI, Patel A. Stockpiling Ventilators for Influenza Pandemics. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1021-1022. doi:10.3201/eid2306.170434.
    APA Meltzer, M. I., & Patel, A. (2017). Stockpiling Ventilators for Influenza Pandemics. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1021-1022. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.170434.
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Research Letters

  • Epidemiologic Survey of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection, Tibet, China, 2015 PDF Version [PDF - 324 KB - 2 pages]
    H. Zhang et al.
        View Abstract

    We investigated Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) prevalence in high-altitude regions of Tibet, China, by using standard assays to test mosquitoes, pigs, and humans. Results confirmed that JEV has spread to these areas. Disease prevention and control strategies should be used along with surveillance to limit spread of JEV in high-altitude regions of Tibet.

        Cite This Article
    EID Zhang H, Rehman M, Li K, Luo H, Lan Y, Nabi F, et al. Epidemiologic Survey of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection, Tibet, China, 2015. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1023-1024. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.152115
    AMA Zhang H, Rehman M, Li K, et al. Epidemiologic Survey of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection, Tibet, China, 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1023-1024. doi:10.3201/eid2306.152115.
    APA Zhang, H., Rehman, M., Li, K., Luo, H., Lan, Y., Nabi, F....Li, J. (2017). Epidemiologic Survey of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection, Tibet, China, 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1023-1024. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.152115.
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  • High Frequency of Mayaro Virus IgM among Febrile Patients, Central Brazil PDF Version [PDF - 319 KB - 2 pages]
    S. Brunini et al.
        View Abstract

    Mayaro virus (MAYV), an Aedes mosquito–borne alphavirus, is endemic to Brazil and other South America countries. We investigated dengue- and chikungunya-negative febrile patients visiting rural areas near Goiânia, Goiás, and found a high proportion (55%) of MAYV IgM. Our findings suggest the presence of highly endemic foci of MAYV in central Brazil.

        Cite This Article
    EID Brunini S, França D, Silva J, Silva L, Silva F, Spadoni M, et al. High Frequency of Mayaro Virus IgM among Febrile Patients, Central Brazil. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1025-1026. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.160929
    AMA Brunini S, França D, Silva J, et al. High Frequency of Mayaro Virus IgM among Febrile Patients, Central Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1025-1026. doi:10.3201/eid2306.160929.
    APA Brunini, S., França, D., Silva, J., Silva, L., Silva, F., Spadoni, M....Rezza, G. (2017). High Frequency of Mayaro Virus IgM among Febrile Patients, Central Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1025-1026. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.160929.
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  • Ebola Virus Imported from Guinea to Senegal, 2014 PDF Version [PDF - 442 KB - 3 pages]
    D. Ka et al.
        View Abstract

    In March 2014, the World Health Organization declared an outbreak of Ebola virus disease in Guinea. In August 2014, a case caused by virus imported from Guinea occurred in Senegal, most likely resulting from nonsecure funerals and travel. Preparedness and surveillance in Senegal probably prevented secondary cases.

        Cite This Article
    EID Ka D, Fall G, Diallo V, Faye O, Fortes L, Faye O, et al. Ebola Virus Imported from Guinea to Senegal, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1026-1028. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161092
    AMA Ka D, Fall G, Diallo V, et al. Ebola Virus Imported from Guinea to Senegal, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1026-1028. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161092.
    APA Ka, D., Fall, G., Diallo, V., Faye, O., Fortes, L., Faye, O....Sall, A. (2017). Ebola Virus Imported from Guinea to Senegal, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1026-1028. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161092.
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  • Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus in Ticks and Roe Deer, the Netherlands PDF Version [PDF - 495 KB - 3 pages]
    S. Jahfari et al.
        View Abstract

    We report the presence of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) in the Netherlands. Serologic screening of roe deer found TBEV-neutralizing antibodies with a seroprevalence of 2%, and TBEV RNA was detected in 2 ticks from the same location. Enhanced surveillance and awareness among medical professionals has led to the identification of autochthonous cases.

        Cite This Article
    EID Jahfari S, de Vries A, Rijks JM, Van Gucht S, Vennema H, Sprong H, et al. Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus in Ticks and Roe Deer, the Netherlands. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1028-1030. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161247
    AMA Jahfari S, de Vries A, Rijks JM, et al. Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus in Ticks and Roe Deer, the Netherlands. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1028-1030. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161247.
    APA Jahfari, S., de Vries, A., Rijks, J. M., Van Gucht, S., Vennema, H., Sprong, H....Rockx, B. (2017). Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus in Ticks and Roe Deer, the Netherlands. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1028-1030. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161247.
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  • Outbreaks of Tilapia Lake Virus Infection, Thailand, 2015–2016 PDF Version [PDF - 562 KB - 3 pages]
    W. Surachetpong et al.
        View Abstract

    During 2015–2016, several outbreaks of tilapia lake virus infection occurred among tilapia in Thailand. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the virus from Thailand grouped with a tilapia virus (family Orthomyxoviridae) from Israel. This emerging virus is a threat to tilapia aquaculture in Asia and worldwide.

        Cite This Article
    EID Surachetpong W, Janetanakit T, Nonthabenjawan N, Tattiyapong P, Sirikanchana K, Amonsin A, et al. Outbreaks of Tilapia Lake Virus Infection, Thailand, 2015–2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1031-1033. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161278
    AMA Surachetpong W, Janetanakit T, Nonthabenjawan N, et al. Outbreaks of Tilapia Lake Virus Infection, Thailand, 2015–2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1031-1033. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161278.
    APA Surachetpong, W., Janetanakit, T., Nonthabenjawan, N., Tattiyapong, P., Sirikanchana, K., & Amonsin, A. (2017). Outbreaks of Tilapia Lake Virus Infection, Thailand, 2015–2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1031-1033. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161278.
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  • Endemic Hantavirus in Field Voles, Northern England PDF Version [PDF - 639 KB - 3 pages]
    A. G. Thomason et al.
        View Abstract

    We report a PCR survey of hantavirus infection in an extensive field vole (Microtus agrestis) population present in the Kielder Forest, northern England. A Tatenale virus–like lineage was frequently detected (≈17% prevalence) in liver tissue. Lineages genetically similar to Tatenale virus are likely to be endemic in northern England.

        Cite This Article
    EID Thomason AG, Begon M, Bradley JE, Paterson S, Jackson JA. Endemic Hantavirus in Field Voles, Northern England. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1033-1035. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161607
    AMA Thomason AG, Begon M, Bradley JE, et al. Endemic Hantavirus in Field Voles, Northern England. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1033-1035. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161607.
    APA Thomason, A. G., Begon, M., Bradley, J. E., Paterson, S., & Jackson, J. A. (2017). Endemic Hantavirus in Field Voles, Northern England. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1033-1035. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161607.
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  • Measles Cases during Ebola Outbreak, West Africa, 2013–2106 PDF Version [PDF - 316 KB - 3 pages]
    F. Colavita et al.
        View Abstract

    The recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa caused breakdowns in public health systems, which might have caused outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. We tested 80 patients admitted to an Ebola treatment center in Freetown, Sierra Leone, for measles. These patients were negative for Ebola virus. Measles virus IgM was detected in 13 (16%) of the patients.

        Cite This Article
    EID Colavita F, Biava M, Castilletti C, Quartu S, Vairo F, Caglioti C, et al. Measles Cases during Ebola Outbreak, West Africa, 2013–2106. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1035-1037. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161682
    AMA Colavita F, Biava M, Castilletti C, et al. Measles Cases during Ebola Outbreak, West Africa, 2013–2106. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1035-1037. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161682.
    APA Colavita, F., Biava, M., Castilletti, C., Quartu, S., Vairo, F., Caglioti, C....Di Caro, A. (2017). Measles Cases during Ebola Outbreak, West Africa, 2013–2106. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1035-1037. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161682.
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  • Angiostrongylus cantonensis Meningitis and Myelitis, Texas, USA PDF Version [PDF - 508 KB - 2 pages]
    R. Al Hammoud et al.
        View Abstract

    Infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis roundworms is endemic in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Basin. A. cantonensis meningitis and myelitis occurred in summer 2013 in a child with no history of travel outside of Texas, USA. Angiostrongyliasis is an emerging neurotropic helminthic disease in Texas and warrants increased awareness among healthcare providers.

        Cite This Article
    EID Al Hammoud R, Nayes SL, Murphy JR, Heresi GP, Butler IJ, Pérez N, et al. Angiostrongylus cantonensis Meningitis and Myelitis, Texas, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1037-1038. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161683
    AMA Al Hammoud R, Nayes SL, Murphy JR, et al. Angiostrongylus cantonensis Meningitis and Myelitis, Texas, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1037-1038. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161683.
    APA Al Hammoud, R., Nayes, S. L., Murphy, J. R., Heresi, G. P., Butler, I. J., & Pérez, N. (2017). Angiostrongylus cantonensis Meningitis and Myelitis, Texas, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1037-1038. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161683.
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  • Enterocytozoon bieneusi Microsporidiosis in Stem Cell Transplant Recipients Treated with Fumagillin PDF Version [PDF - 404 KB - 3 pages]
    I. Bukreyeva et al.
        View Abstract

    Enterocytozoon bieneusi microsporidiosis is an emerging disease in immunocompromised patients. We report 2 cases of this disease in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients successfully treated with fumagillin. Thrombocytopenia occurred but without major adverse events. Modifications of immunosuppression could be avoided when E. bieneusi is rapidly identified and fumagillin therapy is started promptly.

        Cite This Article
    EID Bukreyeva I, Angoulvant A, Bendib I, Gagnard J, Bourhis J, Dargère S, et al. Enterocytozoon bieneusi Microsporidiosis in Stem Cell Transplant Recipients Treated with Fumagillin. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1039-1041. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161825
    AMA Bukreyeva I, Angoulvant A, Bendib I, et al. Enterocytozoon bieneusi Microsporidiosis in Stem Cell Transplant Recipients Treated with Fumagillin. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1039-1041. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161825.
    APA Bukreyeva, I., Angoulvant, A., Bendib, I., Gagnard, J., Bourhis, J., Dargère, S....Wyplosz, B. (2017). Enterocytozoon bieneusi Microsporidiosis in Stem Cell Transplant Recipients Treated with Fumagillin. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1039-1041. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161825.
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  • Influenza A(H9N2) Virus, Myanmar, 2014–2015 PDF Version [PDF - 859 KB - 3 pages]
    T. Lin et al.
        View Abstract

    Routine surveillance of influenza A virus was conducted in Myanmar during 2014–2015. Influenza A(H9N2) virus was isolated in Shan State, upper Myanmar. Whole-genome sequencing showed that H9N2 virus from Myanmar was closely related to H9N2 virus of clade 4.2.5 from China.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lin T, Nonthabenjawan N, Chaiyawong S, Bunpapong N, Boonyapisitsopa S, Janetanakit T, et al. Influenza A(H9N2) Virus, Myanmar, 2014–2015. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1041-1043. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161902
    AMA Lin T, Nonthabenjawan N, Chaiyawong S, et al. Influenza A(H9N2) Virus, Myanmar, 2014–2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1041-1043. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161902.
    APA Lin, T., Nonthabenjawan, N., Chaiyawong, S., Bunpapong, N., Boonyapisitsopa, S., Janetanakit, T....Amonsin, A. (2017). Influenza A(H9N2) Virus, Myanmar, 2014–2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1041-1043. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161902.
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  • PCR Detection of Mimivirus PDF Version [PDF - 345 KB - 2 pages]
    D. Raoult et al.
        View Abstract

    In an epidemiological study, mimivirus was reported as an unlikely cause of human respiratory infections in China. Our analysis revealed the nonsensitivity of the PCR method, which detected less than 10% of the current known mimivirus. We conclude that epidemiologic studies must use accurate and sensitive laboratory test methods.

        Cite This Article
    EID Raoult D, Levasseur A, La Scola B. PCR Detection of Mimivirus. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1044-1045. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161896
    AMA Raoult D, Levasseur A, La Scola B. PCR Detection of Mimivirus. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1044-1045. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161896.
    APA Raoult, D., Levasseur, A., & La Scola, B. (2017). PCR Detection of Mimivirus. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1044-1045. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161896.
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  • Autochthonous Case of Eosinophilic Meningitis Caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis, France, 2016 PDF Version [PDF - 309 KB - 2 pages]
    Y. Nguyen et al.
        View Abstract

    We report a case of a 54-year-old Moroccan woman living in France diagnosed with eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Diagnosis was based on clinical symptoms and confirmed by testing of serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples. Physicians should consider the risk for A. cantonensis infection outside of endemic areas.

        Cite This Article
    EID Nguyen Y, Rossi B, Argy N, Baker C, Nickel B, Marti H, et al. Autochthonous Case of Eosinophilic Meningitis Caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis, France, 2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1045-1046. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161999
    AMA Nguyen Y, Rossi B, Argy N, et al. Autochthonous Case of Eosinophilic Meningitis Caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis, France, 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1045-1046. doi:10.3201/eid2306.161999.
    APA Nguyen, Y., Rossi, B., Argy, N., Baker, C., Nickel, B., Marti, H....Lefort, A. (2017). Autochthonous Case of Eosinophilic Meningitis Caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis, France, 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1045-1046. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.161999.
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  • Zika Virus–Associated Cognitive Impairment in Adolescent, 2016 PDF Version [PDF - 306 KB - 2 pages]
    J. Zucker et al.
        View Abstract

    Incidence of neurologic manifestations associated with Zika virus infection has been increasing. In 2016, neuropsychological and cognitive changes developed in an adolescent after travel to a Zika virus–endemic area. Single-photon emission computed tomography and neuropsychological testing raised the possibility that Zika virus infection may lead to neuropsychiatric and cognitive symptoms.

        Cite This Article
    EID Zucker J, Neu N, Chiriboga CA, Hinton VJ, Leonardo M, Sheikh A, et al. Zika Virus–Associated Cognitive Impairment in Adolescent, 2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1047-1048. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.162029
    AMA Zucker J, Neu N, Chiriboga CA, et al. Zika Virus–Associated Cognitive Impairment in Adolescent, 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1047-1048. doi:10.3201/eid2306.162029.
    APA Zucker, J., Neu, N., Chiriboga, C. A., Hinton, V. J., Leonardo, M., Sheikh, A....Thakur, K. (2017). Zika Virus–Associated Cognitive Impairment in Adolescent, 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1047-1048. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.162029.
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  • Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N8) Clade 2.3.4.4 Infection in Migratory Birds, Egypt PDF Version [PDF - 2.14 MB - 4 pages]
    A. A. Selim et al.
        View Abstract

    We isolated highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N8) of clade 2.3.4.4 from the common coot (Fulica atra) in Egypt, documenting its introduction into Africa through migratory birds. This virus has a close genetic relationship with subtype H5N8 viruses circulating in Europe. Enhanced surveillance to detect newly emerging viruses is warranted.

        Cite This Article
    EID Selim AA, Erfan AM, Hagag N, Zanaty A, Samir A, Samy M, et al. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N8) Clade 2.3.4.4 Infection in Migratory Birds, Egypt. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):1048-1051. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.162056
    AMA Selim AA, Erfan AM, Hagag N, et al. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N8) Clade 2.3.4.4 Infection in Migratory Birds, Egypt. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):1048-1051. doi:10.3201/eid2306.162056.
    APA Selim, A. A., Erfan, A. M., Hagag, N., Zanaty, A., Samir, A., Samy, M....Naguib, M. M. (2017). Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N8) Clade 2.3.4.4 Infection in Migratory Birds, Egypt. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 1048-1051. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.162056.
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Etymologia

  • Etymologia: Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease PDF Version [PDF - 878 KB - 1 page]
    R. Henry and F. A. Murphy
            Cite This Article
    EID Henry R, Murphy FA. Etymologia: Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23(6):956. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.ET2306
    AMA Henry R, Murphy FA. Etymologia: Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017;23(6):956. doi:10.3201/eid2306.ET2306.
    APA Henry, R., & Murphy, F. A. (2017). Etymologia: Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(6), 956. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.ET2306.
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