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MERS

MERS is an illness caused by a virus called Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV). MERS affects the respiratory system. Most MERS patients developed severe acute respiratory illness with symptoms of fever, cough and shortness of breath. Health officials first reported the disease in Saudi Arabia in September 2012. Through retrospective investigations, health officials later identified that the first known cases of MERS occurred in Jordan in April 2012. MERS-CoV has spread from people with the virus to others through close contact, such as caring for or living with an infected person.

2019

Sequential Emergence and Wide Spread of Neutralization Escape Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Mutants, South Korea, 2015
Yeon-Sook Kim et al. (Volume 25, Number 6) Risk Factors for MERS-CoV Seropositivity among Animal Market and Slaughterhouse Workers, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 2014–2017
Ahmed Khudhair et al. (Volume 25, Number 5) Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection Dynamics and Antibody Responses among Clinically Diverse Patients, Saudi Arabia
Hail M. Al-Abdely et al. (Volume 25, Number 4) Survey on Implementation of One Health Approach for MERS-CoV Preparedness and Control in Gulf Cooperation Council and Middle East Countries
Elmoubasher Abu Baker Farag et al. (Volume 25, Number 3) Epidemiology of Imported Infectious Diseases, China, 2005–2016
Yali Wang et al. (Volume 25, Number 1)

2018

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Antibodies in Dromedary Camels, Bangladesh, 2015
Ariful Islam et al. (Volume 24, Number 5)

2017

US Federal Travel Restrictions for Persons with Higher-Risk Exposures to Communicable Diseases of Public Health Concern
Laura A. Vonnahme et al. (Volume 23, Number 13) Conveyance Contact Investigation for Imported Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Cases, United States, May 2014
Susan A. Lippold et al. (Volume 23, Number 9) MERS-CoV Antibody Responses 1 Year after Symptom Onset, South Korea, 2015
Pyoeng Gyun Choe et al. (Volume 23, Number 7) Domestic Pig Unlikely Reservoir for MERS-CoV
Emmie de Wit et al. (Volume 23, Number 6) Hospital Outbreaks of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, Daejeon, South Korea, 2015
Jung Wan Park et al. (Volume 23, Number 6) Surveillance and Testing for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus, Saudi Arabia, April 2015–February 2016
Abdulaziz A. Bin Saeed et al. (Volume 23, Number 4) Serologic Evidence for MERS-CoV Infection in Dromedary Camels, Punjab, Pakistan, 2012–2015
Muhammad Saqib et al. (Volume 23, Number 3) Livestock Susceptibility to Infection with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus
Júlia Vergara-Alert et al. (Volume 23, Number 2)

2016

Time Course of MERS-CoV Infection and Immunity in Dromedary Camels
Benjamin Meyer et al. (Volume 22, Number 12) Exposures among MERS Case-Patients, Saudi Arabia, January–February 2016
Raafat Alhakeem et al. (Volume 22, Number 11) Risk Factors for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection among Healthcare Personnel
Basem M. Alraddadi et al. (Volume 22, Number 11) Estimation of Severe Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Cases in the Middle East, 2012–2016
Justin J. O’Hagan et al. (Volume 22, Number 10) Pandemic
Jennifer B. Nuzzo et al. (Volume 22, Number 10) Persistence of Antibodies against Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus
Daniel C. Payne et al. (Volume 22, Number 10) Viral RNA in Blood as Indicator of Severe Outcome in Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection
So Yeon Kim et al. (Volume 22, Number 10) Contact Tracing for Imported Case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, China, 2015
Min Kang et al. (Volume 22, Number 9) Feasibility of Using Convalescent Plasma Immunotherapy for MERS-CoV Infection, Saudi Arabia
Yaseen M. Arabi et al. (Volume 22, Number 9) Toward Developing a Preventive MERS-CoV Vaccine—Report from a Workshop Organized by the Saudi Arabia Ministry of Health and the International Vaccine Institute, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, November 14–15, 2015
Jean-Louis Excler et al. (Volume 22, Number 8) Development of Medical Countermeasures to Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus
Timothy M. Uyeki et al. (Volume 22, Number 7) Response to Emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 2013–2014
Farida Ismail Al Hosani et al. (Volume 22, Number 7) Antibody Response and Disease Severity in Healthcare Worker MERS Survivors
Abeer N. Alshukairi et al. (Volume 22, Number 6) Experimental Infection and Response to Rechallenge of Alpacas with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus
Gary Crameri et al. (Volume 22, Number 6) Infection, Replication, and Transmission of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in Alpacas
Danielle R. Adney et al. (Volume 22, Number 6) MERS-CoV Antibodies in Humans, Africa, 2013–2014
Anne M. Liljander et al. (Volume 22, Number 6) MERS-CoV Infection of Alpaca in a Region Where MERS-CoV is Endemic
Chantal B.E.M. Reusken et al. (Volume 22, Number 6) Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome at Tertiary Care Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, 2014
Deborah L. Hastings et al. (Volume 22, Number 5) Deletion Variants of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus from Humans, Jordan, 2015
Mart M. Lamers et al. (Volume 22, Number 4) Exportations of Symptomatic Cases of MERS-CoV Infection to Countries outside the Middle East
Cristina Carias et al. (Volume 22, Number 4) Transmission of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infections in Healthcare Settings, Abu Dhabi
Jennifer C. Hunter et al. (Volume 22, Number 4) Absence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in Camelids, Kazakhstan, 2015
Eve Miguel et al. (Volume 22, Number 3) Association between Severity of MERS-CoV Infection and Incubation Period
Victor Virlogeux et al. (Volume 22, Number 3) Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus during Pregnancy, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 2013
Asim Malik et al. (Volume 22, Number 3) Microevolution of Outbreak-Associated Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus, South Korea, 2015
Moon-Woo Seong et al. (Volume 22, Number 2) Multifacility Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in Taif, Saudi Arabia
Abdullah M. Assiri et al. (Volume 22, Number 1) Objective Determination of End of MERS Outbreak, South Korea, 2015
Hiroshi Nishiura et al. (Volume 22, Number 1) Risk Factors for Primary Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Illness in Humans, Saudi Arabia, 2014
Basem M. Alraddadi et al. (Volume 22, Number 1) Variations in Spike Glycoprotein Gene of MERS-CoV, South Korea, 2015
Dae-Won Kim et al. (Volume 22, Number 1)

2015

Asymptomatic MERS-CoV Infection in Humans Possibly Linked to Infected Dromedaries Imported from Oman to United Arab Emirates, May 2015
Zulaikha M. Al Hammadi et al. (Volume 21, Number 12) Characteristics of Traveler with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, China, 2015
Wen Da Guan et al. (Volume 21, Number 12) Kinetics of Serologic Responses to MERS Coronavirus Infection in Humans, South Korea
Wan Beom Park et al. (Volume 21, Number 12) Association of Higher MERS-CoV Virus Load with Severe Disease and Death, Saudi Arabia, 2014
Daniel R. Feikin et al. (Volume 21, Number 11) Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in 3 Persons, South Korea, 2015
Jeong-Sun Yang et al. (Volume 21, Number 11) Molecular Epidemiology of Hospital Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 2014
Shamsudeen F. Fagbo et al. (Volume 21, Number 11) Mortality Risk Factors for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Outbreak, South Korea, 2015
Maimuna S. Majumder et al. (Volume 21, Number 11) Acute Respiratory Infections in Travelers Returning from MERS-CoV–Affected Areas
Matthew German et al. (Volume 21, Number 9) Follow-up of Contacts of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus–Infected Returning Travelers, the Netherlands, 2014
Madelief Mollers et al. (Volume 21, Number 9) Laboratory Testing for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus, California, USA, 2013–2014
Mahtab Shahkarami et al. (Volume 21, Number 9) Human–Bat Interactions in Rural West Africa
Priscilla Anti et al. (Volume 21, Number 8) Occupational Exposure to Dromedaries and Risk for MERS-CoV Infection, Qatar, 2013–2014
Chantal B.E.M. Reusken et al. (Volume 21, Number 8) Absence of MERS-Coronavirus in Bactrian Camels, Southern Mongolia, November 2014
Samuel M.S. Chan et al. (Volume 21, Number 7) Evaluation of Patients under Investigation for MERS-CoV Infection, United States, January 2013–October 2014
Eileen Schneider et al. (Volume 21, Number 7) Lack of Transmission among Close Contacts of Patient with Case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Imported into the United States, 2014
Lucy Breakwell et al. (Volume 21, Number 7) MERS-CoV in Upper Respiratory Tract and Lungs of Dromedary Camels, Saudi Arabia, 2013–2014
Abdelmalik I. Khalafalla et al. (Volume 21, Number 7) Acute Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection in Livestock Dromedaries, Dubai, 2014
Sung Sup Park et al. (Volume 21, Number 6) Influenza A and B Viruses but Not MERS-CoV in Hajj Pilgrims, Austria, 2014
Judith H. Aberle et al. (Volume 21, Number 4) Lack of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Transmission from Infected Camels
Maged G. Hemida et al. (Volume 21, Number 4) Cluster of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infections in Iran, 2014
Jila Yavarian et al. (Volume 21, Number 2) Serologic Assessment of Possibility for MERS-CoV Infection in Equids
Benjamin Meyer et al. (Volume 21, Number 1)

2014

Health Care Worker Contact with MERS Patient, Saudi Arabia
Aron J. Hall et al. (Volume 20, Number 12) MERS Coronavirus Neutralizing Antibodies in Camels, Eastern Africa, 1983–1997
Marcel A. Müller et al. (Volume 20, Number 12) Replication and Shedding of MERS-CoV in Upper Respiratory Tract of Inoculated Dromedary Camels
Danielle R. Adney et al. (Volume 20, Number 12) Enhanced MERS Coronavirus Surveillance of Travelers from the Middle East to England
Helen Lucy Thomas et al. (Volume 20, Number 9) Family Cluster of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infections, Tunisia, 2013
Fekri Abroug et al. (Volume 20, Number 9) Antibodies against MERS Coronavirus in Dromedary Camels, Kenya, 1992–2013
Victor M. Corman et al. (Volume 20, Number 8) Geographic Distribution of MERS Coronavirus among Dromedary Camels, Africa
Chantal B.E.M. Reusken et al. (Volume 20, Number 8) Isolation of MERS Coronavirus from a Dromedary Camel, Qatar, 2014
V. Stalin Raj et al. (Volume 20, Number 8) MERS Coronavirus in Dromedary Camel Herd, Saudi Arabia
Maged G. Hemida et al. (Volume 20, Number 7) MERS–Related Betacoronavirus in Vespertilio superans Bats, China
Li Yang et al. (Volume 20, Number 7) Stability of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in Milk
Neeltje van Doremalen et al. (Volume 20, Number 7) Human Infection with MERS Coronavirus after Exposure to Infected Camels, Saudi Arabia, 2013
Ziad A. Memish et al. (Volume 20, Number 6) MERS Coronaviruses in Dromedary Camels, Egypt
Daniel K.W. Chu et al. (Volume 20, Number 6) Podcast Unraveling the Mysteries of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus
John T. Watson et al. (Volume 20, Number 6) presentation_01Listen to the podcast Antibodies against MERS Coronavirus in Dromedary Camels, United Arab Emirates, 2003 and 2013
Benjamin Meyer et al. (Volume 20, Number 4) Contact Investigation for Imported Case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, Germany
Annicka Reuss et al. (Volume 20, Number 4) Lack of MERS Coronavirus but Prevalence of Influenza Virus in French Pilgrims after 2013 Hajj
Philippe Gautret et al. (Volume 20, Number 4) Novel Betacoronavirus in Dromedaries of the Middle East, 2013
Patrick C.Y. Woo et al. (Volume 20, Number 4) Replicative Capacity of MERS Coronavirus in Livestock Cell Lines
Isabella Eckerle et al. (Volume 20, Number 2)

2013

Lack of MERS Coronavirus Neutralizing Antibodies in Humans, Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia
Stefanie Gierer et al. (Volume 19, Number 12) Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in Bats, Saudi Arabia
Ziad A. Memish et al. (Volume 19, Number 11) Close Relative of Human Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in Bat, South Africa
Ndapewa Laudika Ithete et al. (Volume 19, Number 10)

Other Resources

CDC MERS Information

WHO MERS Information

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