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Volume 10, Number 12—December 2004

Research

Nonsusceptibility of Primate Cells to Taura Syndrome Virus

Carlos R. Pantoja*Comments to Author , Solangel A. Navarro*, Jaime Naranjo*, Donald V. Lightner*, and Charles P. Gerba*
Author affiliations: *University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA

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Figure 3

Histologic section through the anterior gastric chamber of a moribund juvenile Litopenaeus vannamei that was injected with an inoculum prepared with tissue cell culture media from BGMK cells exposed to Taura syndrome virus (TSV) (day 7 postexposure). A) The arrows point to a portion of cuticular epithelium displaying diagnostic acute-phase TSV lesions (hematoxylin/eosin-phloxin stain; 50x). B) The dashed arrows point to a portion of the stomach epithelium from the same shrimp, where digoxigenin

Figure 3. Histologic section through the anterior gastric chamber of a moribund juvenile Litopenaeus vannamei that was injected with an inoculum prepared with tissue cell culture media from BGMK cells exposed to Taura syndrome virus (TSV) (day 7 postexposure). A) The arrows point to a portion of cuticular epithelium displaying diagnostic acute-phase TSV lesions (hematoxylin/eosin-phloxin stain; 50x). B) The dashed arrows point to a portion of the stomach epithelium from the same shrimp, where digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled TSV-specific gene probes were reacted by in situ hybridization (ISH), resulting in the deposition of a black precipitate on areas where the probe hybridized with target TSV (Bismarck Brown counterstain; 50x).

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