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Volume 10, Number 4—April 2004

Synopsis

Pediatric Influenza Prevention and Control

Nicola Principi*Comments to Author  and Susanna Esposito*
Author affiliations: *Institute of Pediatrics, University of Milan, Milan, Italy

Main Article

Table 2

Respiratory illness among children with recurrent respiratory tract infections and effectiveness of the influenza vaccine during the follow-up perioda

Event Vaccinated children, n = 64)b Controls, n = 63b Vaccine effectiveness, %c p value
No. of upper respiratory tract infections
2.95 ± 1.33 (3)
4.06 ± 2.13 (4)
27
<0.0001
No. of lower respiratory tract infections
0.67 ± 0.88 (0)
1.01 ± 1.12 (1)
33
0.03
No. of febrile respiratory illnesses
1.60 ± 1.39 (1)
2.06 ± 2.14 (2)
23
0.02
No. of hospitalizations
0.05 ± 0.10 (0)
0.10 ± 0.25 (0)
60
0.34
No. of antimicrobial prescriptions
1.31 ± 1.33 (1)
2.35 ± 1.59 (2)
44
<0.0001
No. of antipyretic prescriptions
2.16 ± 2.03 (2)
3.98 ± 2.37 (4)
45
<0.0001
Missed school days 5.35 ± 8.14 (6) 13.83 ±12.50 (10) 61 <0.0001

aModified from S. Esposito et al. (14).
bMean values ± standard deviation (median in parentheses).
cVaccine effectiveness: 1 minus attack rate (defined as rate of illness divided by total population) among vaccinated children divided by attack rate among controls.

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