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Volume 11, Number 6—June 2005

Research

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci in Rural Communities, Western United States

Kurt B. Stevenson*†Comments to Author , Katy Searle†, Gregory Stoddard†, and Matthew H. Samore†‡
Author affiliations: *Qualis Health, Boise, Idaho, USA; †University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA; ‡VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

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Table 4

Comparison of MRSA cases with resistant and susceptible phenotypes*

No (%)
Resistant group†, N = 142 Susceptible group‡, N = 32 p value§
Skin and soft tissue 74 (52) 26 (81) 0.003
Urine 15 (11) 0 (0) NS
Blood 9 (6) 1 (3) NS
Sputum 30 (21) 1 (3) 0.019
Other source 14 (10) 4 (13) NS
Community-associated 38 (27) 24 (75) <0.0001
Sex
Male 79 (56) 17 (53)
Female 63 (44) 15 (47)
Mean age (y) 69 32 0.0001
Age >65 y 89 (63) 3 (9) <0.0001
Diabetes mellitus 38 (27) 1 (3) 0.002
Renal failure 13 (9) 0 (0) NS
Prior antimicrobial therapy 61 (43) 6 (19) 0.015
Immunosuppression 14 (10) 0 (0) NS

*MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; NS, not significant.
†MRSA isolates resistant to both clindamycin and ciprofloxacin.
‡MRSA isolates susceptible to both clindamycin and ciprofloxacin.
§Based on Fisher exact test. Comparison of age tested by Kruskal-Wallis equality of populations rank test.

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