Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Volume 11, Number 8—August 2005

Perspective

Virology, Pathology, and Clinical Manifestations of West Nile Virus Disease

Edward B. Hayes*Comments to Author , James J. Sejvar†, Sherif R. Zaki†, Robert S. Lanciotti*, Amy V. Bode*, and Grant L. Campbell*
Author affiliations: *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA; †Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta Georgia, USA

Main Article

Figure

Histopathologic features of West Nile virus (WNV) in human tissues. Panels A and B show inflammation, microglial nodules, and variable necrosis that occur during WNV encephalitis; panel C shows WNV antigen (red) in neurons and neuronal processes using an immunohistochemical stain; panel D is an electron micrograph of WNV in the endoplasmic reticulum of a nerve cell (arrow). Bar = 100 nm.

Figure. . Histopathologic features of West Nile virus (WNV) in human tissues. Panels A and B show inflammation, microglial nodules, and variable necrosis that occur during WNV encephalitis; panel C shows WNV antigen (red) in neurons and neuronal processes using an immunohistochemical stain; panel D is an electron micrograph of WNV in the endoplasmic reticulum of a nerve cell (arrow). Bar = 100 nm.

Main Article

Top of Page

 

Past Issues

Select a Past Issue:

Art in Science - Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases
Now available for order



CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives, Protecting People, Saving Money. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO