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Volume 13, Number 1—January 2007

Dispatch

Human Subcutaneous Dirofilariasis, Russia

Laura H. Kramer*Comments to Author , Vladimir V. Kartashev†, Giulio Grandi*, Rodrigo Morchón‡, Sergei A. Nagornii§, Panagiotis Karanis¶, and Fernando Simón‡
Author affiliations: *Università degli Studi di Parma, Parma, Italy; †Rostov State Medical University, Rostov-on-Don, Russia; ‡Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; §Rostov Research Institute of Microbiology and Parasitology, Rostov-on-Don, Russia; ¶University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany;

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Figure 1

A) Histologic analysis of skin nodules caused by human subcutaneous dirofilariasis. Cross-sections of Dirofilaria repens surrounded by an inflammatory granuloma. Note the uteri with developing embryos (hematoxylin and eosin stain, original magnification 10×). B) Analysis of patient samples by agarose gel electrophoresis. Lane 1, 100-bp DNA molecular mass weight marker; lane 2, negative control; lane 3, positive control; lane 4, patient sample showing banding pattern typical of the positive contr

Figure 1. A) Histologic analysis of skin nodules caused by human subcutaneous dirofilariasis. Cross-sections of Dirofilaria repens surrounded by an inflammatory granuloma. Note the uteri with developing embryos (hematoxylin and eosin stain, original magnification 10×). B) Analysis of patient samples by agarose gel electrophoresis. Lane 1, 100-bp DNA molecular mass weight marker; lane 2, negative control; lane 3, positive control; lane 4, patient sample showing banding pattern typical of the positive control and similar to the banding pattern described in the original protocol (7).

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