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Volume 13, Number 12—December 2007

Dispatch

Clinical and Epidemiologic Characterization of WU Polyomavirus Infection, St. Louis, Missouri

Binh-Minh Le*, Lee M. Demertzis*, Guang Wu*, Robert J. Tibbets*, Richard Buller*, Max Q. Arens*, Anne M. Gaynor*, Gregory A. Storch*, and David Wang*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA;

Main Article

Table

Clinical parameters in episodes of WU polyomavirus infection

Symptoms and physical examination findings (n = 65) %
Symptoms
Cough 57
Upper respiratory tract symptoms 55
Rhonchi/crackles/coarse breath sounds 46
Shortness of breath or increased work of breathing 42
Wheezing 40
Rhinorrhea 38
Retractions 37
Decreased oral intake 34
Vomiting 32
Diarrhea 18
Stridor 6
Rash 6
Apnea 5
Signs
Tachypnea* (n = 57) 79
Hypoxia† (n = 55) 47
Fever‡ (n = 63) 41
Bandemia (n = 42) 40
Leukocytosis§ (n = 42) 31
Leukopenia¶ (n = 42) 10
Radiographic or computed tomographic findings (n = 50)
Infiltrate or consolidation 72
Hyperinflation 14
Peribronchial cuffing 12
Effusions 6
Treatment
Antimicrobial agents (n = 65) 58
Bronchodilators (n = 65) 38
Steroids (n = 65) 37
Oxygen (n = 65) 25
Intubation (n = 63) 11
Intensive care (n = 63) 19
Risk factors
Daycare 32
Sick contacts 25
Medical history
Asthma (n = 60) 37

*Defined per National Institutes of Health clinical center guidelines.
†SaO2 <95% or PaO2 >80%.
‡Temperature >38°C.
§Leukocyte count >15,000/mm3.
¶Leukocyte count <4,000/mm3.

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