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Volume 13, Number 9—September 2007

Research

Family Clustering of Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis in Traditional and New Geographic Regions

Vsevolod A. Vladimirtsev*, Raisa S. Nikitina*, Neil Renwick†, Anastasia A. Ivanova*, Al’bina P. Danilova*, Fyodor A. Platonov*, Vadim G. Krivoshapkin*, Catriona A. McLean‡, Colin L. Masters‡, D. Carleton Gajdusek§, and Lev G. Goldfarb¶Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Institute of Health–Sakha (Yakut) Republic, Yakutsk, Russian Federation; †Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA; ‡University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; §Institut Alfred Fessard, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; ¶National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA;

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Figure

Location of families with Viliuisk encephalomyelitis characterized in this report. Arrow indicates the general direction of Viliuisk encephalomyelitis dispersion from traditional disease-endemic areas on the Viliui River to densely populated regions of the Sakha (Yakut) Republic around the capital city of Yakutsk.

Figure. Location of families with Viliuisk encephalomyelitis characterized in this report. Arrow indicates the general direction of Viliuisk encephalomyelitis dispersion from traditional disease-endemic areas on the Viliui River to densely populated regions of the Sakha (Yakut) Republic around the capital city of Yakutsk.

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