Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to site content
CDC Home

Volume 13, Number 9—September 2007

Research

Family Clustering of Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis in Traditional and New Geographic Regions

Vsevolod A. Vladimirtsev*, Raisa S. Nikitina*, Neil Renwick†, Anastasia A. Ivanova*, Al’bina P. Danilova*, Fyodor A. Platonov*, Vadim G. Krivoshapkin*, Catriona A. McLean‡, Colin L. Masters‡, D. Carleton Gajdusek§, and Lev G. Goldfarb¶Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Institute of Health–Sakha (Yakut) Republic, Yakutsk, Russian Federation; †Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA; ‡University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; §Institut Alfred Fessard, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; ¶National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA;

Main Article

Table 2

Laboratory investigations and postmortem findings in Viliuisk encephalomyelitis patients from 6 families*

Laboratory and postmortem findings Family 1
Family 2
Family 3
Family 4
Family 5
Family 6
1-1 1-2 1-3 2-1 2-2 3-1 3-2 4-1 4-2 4-3 5-1 5-2 6-1 6-2 6-3
Cerebrospinal fluid
Cell count (cells/μL) 20–102 8 3 45–62 15–44 2 11–58 25 17 4–
18 NA 12 NA 17–65 11–27
Predominant cell type Lym Lym Lym Lym Lym Lym
Protein (mg/dL) 150 166 23 480 99 16 99 33 66 132 66 66 99
Bacterial culture Neg Neg NA Neg Neg NA Neg NA NA NA NA Neg Neg
Postmortem
Inflamed meninges + + + + + +
Micronecrotic lesions in
 the brain parenchyma + + + + + +

*NA, data not available; Lym, lymphocytes; Neg, negative; +, observed.

Main Article

Top of Page

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO