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Volume 14, Number 4—April 2008

Dispatch

Human Mycobacterium bovis Infection and Bovine Tuberculosis Outbreak, Michigan, 1994–2007

Melinda J. Wilkins*Comments to Author , Joshua Meyerson†, Paul C. Bartlett‡, Susan L. Spieldenner*, Dale E. Berry*, Laura B. Mosher*, John B. Kaneene‡, Barbara Robinson-Dunn§, Mary Grace Stobierski*, and Matthew L. Boulton¶
Author affiliations: *Michigan Department of Community Health, Lansing, Michigan, USA; †Health Department of Northwest Michigan, Charlevoix, Michigan, USA; ‡Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA; §Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan, USA; ¶University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA;

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Figure

Photo of the chest cavity of a deer shot by patient 2; the deer was retrieved after being buried for 9 weeks. The photo shows the classical nodular lesions of Mycobacterium bovis infection. Photo: J.S. Fierke, D.J. O’Brien, S.M. Schmitt, Wildlife Disease Laboratory, Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

Figure. Photo of the chest cavity of a deer shot by patient 2; the deer was retrieved after being buried for 9 weeks. The photo shows the classical nodular lesions of Mycobacterium bovis infection. Photo: J.S. Fierke, D.J. O’Brien, S.M. Schmitt, Wildlife Disease Laboratory, Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

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