Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Volume 14, Number 8—August 2008

Letter

Mycobacterium setense Infection in Humans

Alexandre Toro*, Toidi Adekambi†, François Cheynet‡, Pierre-Edouard Fournier*, and Michel Drancourt*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Université de la Méditerranée, Marseille, France; †Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; ‡Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Marseille, Marseille, France;

Main Article

Figure

Phylogenetic position of isolate 74023791 and 16 rapidly growing Mycobacterium species based on A) 16S rDNA, B) partial RNA polymerase subunit B, and C) partial heat shock protein 65 sequences analyzed by using the neighbor-joining method and Kimura's 2-parameter distance correction model. The support of each branch, as determined from 1,000 bootstrap samples, is indicated by the value at each node when >80% (as a percentage). M. tuberculosis was used as the outgroup species. Scale bars represent differences in nucleotide sequences.

Figure. Phylogenetic position of isolate 74023791 and 16 rapidly growing Mycobacterium species based on A) 16S rDNA, B) partial RNA polymerase subunit B, and C) partial heat shock protein 65 sequences analyzed by using the neighbor-joining method and Kimura's 2-parameter distance correction model. The support of each branch, as determined from 1,000 bootstrap samples, is indicated by the value at each node when >80% (as a percentage). M. tuberculosis was used as the outgroup species. Scale bars represent differences in nucleotide sequences.

Main Article

Top of Page

 

Past Issues

Select a Past Issue:

Art in Science - Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases
Now available for order



CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives, Protecting People, Saving Money. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO