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Volume 15, Number 10—October 2009

Dispatch

Escherichia coli as Reservoir for Macrolide Resistance Genes

Minh Chau Phuc Nguyen, Paul-Louis Woerther, Mathilde Bouvet, Antoine Andremont, Roland LeclercqComments to Author , and Annie Canu
Author affiliations: Université de Caen, Caen, France (M.C.P. Nguyen, M. Bouvet, R. Leclercq, A. Canu); University Paris-Diderot Medical School, Paris, France (P.-L. Woerther, A. Andremont)

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Table 1

MICs of erythromycin and distribution of macrolide resistance genes among 190 Escherichia coli isolates from 5 countries*

E. coli origin (no. isolates) MIC of erythromycin, mg/L

Gene, no. (%)†
Range MIC50 MIC90 erm(B) mph(A) mph(B)
French Guiana, Amerindians (45) 32–1,024 64 128 0 1 (2) 0
Senegal, remote village (20) 64–128 128 128 0 0 0
Niger, children (29) 64–>1,024 256 >1,024 0 9 (31) 0
France, healthy nurses (49) 16–256 64 128 0 2 (4) 1 (2)
France, ESBL isolates (10) 64–1,024 128 1,024 0 3 (30) 1 (10)
Vietnam, ESBL isolates (37) 32–>1,024 512 >1,024 5 (13.5) 19 (51) 0
France, hospital isolates resistant to ampicillin and cotrimoxazole (100) 32–>1,024 64 >1,024 1 (1) 13 (13) 0

*ESBL, extended-spectrum β-lactamase; MIC50, MIC at which 50% of isolates are inhibited; MIC90, MIC at which 90% of isolates are inhibited.
†No isolate contained the erm(A), erm(C), ere(A), ere(B), msr(A), or mef(A) genes.

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