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Volume 15, Number 12—December 2009

Research

Possible Interruption of Malaria Transmission, Highland Kenya, 2007–2008

Chandy C. JohnComments to Author , Melissa A. Riedesel, Ng’wena G. Magak, Kim A. Lindblade, David M. Menge, James S. Hodges, John M. Vulule, and Willis Akhwale
Author affiliations: University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (C.C. John, M.A. Riedesel, D.M. Menge); Moi University School of Medicine, Eldoret, Kenya (N.G. Magak); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (K.A. Lindblade); University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (J.S. Hodges); Kenya Medical Research Institute, Kisian, Kenya (J.M. Vulule); Ministry of Health, Nairobi, Kenya (W. Akhwale)

Main Article

Figure 2

Temperature, rainfall, and vector density in 2 highland areas of western Kenya, April 2003–May 2008. A) Average daily temperature (°C) in Kipsamoite. B) Monthly rainfall (mm) in Kipsamoite. C) Median biweekly vector density (no. Anopheles spp. mosquitoes/household) in Kapsisiywa (red line) and Kipsamoite (black line). Gaps in panels indicate that no data were collected during these periods. Arrows indicate times when indoor residual spraying was conducted.

Figure 2. Temperature, rainfall, and vector density in 2 highland areas of western Kenya, April 2003–May 2008. A) Average daily temperature (°C) in Kipsamoite. B) Monthly rainfall (mm) in Kipsamoite. C) Median biweekly vector density (no. Anopheles spp. mosquitoes/household) in Kapsisiywa (red line) and Kipsamoite (black line). Gaps in panels indicate that no data were collected during these periods. Arrows indicate times when indoor residual spraying was conducted.

Main Article

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