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Volume 15, Number 2—February 2009

Dispatch

Chikungunya Virus and Central Nervous System Infections in Children, India

Penny LewthwaiteComments to Author , Ravi Vasanthapuram, Jane C. Osborne, Ashia Begum, Jenna L.M. Plank, M. Veera Shankar, Roger Hewson, Anita Desai, Nick J. Beeching, Ravi Ravikumar, and Tom Solomon
Author affiliations: University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK (P. Lewthwaite, T. Solomon); National Institute of Mental Health and Neurological Sciences, Bangalore, India (R. Vasanthapuram, A. Desai); Health Protection Agency, Salisbury, UK (J.C. Osborne, J.L.M. Plank, R. Hewson); Vijayanagar Institute of Medical Sciences Bellay, Karnataka, India (A. Begum, M. Veera Shankar, R. Ravikumar); Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool (N.J. Beeching).

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Figure 2

Phylogenetic analysis of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) sequences on the basis of partial E1 gene sequence (position 10620–11148 of the prototype CHIKV S27 genomic sequence). Sequences obtained in this study are in boldface. The analysis was performed using MEGA version 4 software (8), by using the neighbor-joining (p-distance) method. The length of the tree branches indicates the percentage of divergence; the percentage of successful bootstrap replicates is specified at the nodes (1,000 replicates).

Figure 2. Phylogenetic analysis of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) sequences on the basis of partial E1 gene sequence (position 10620–11148 of the prototype CHIKV S27 genomic sequence). Sequences obtained in this study are in boldface. The analysis was performed using MEGA version 4 software (8), by using the neighbor-joining (p-distance) method. The length of the tree branches indicates the percentage of divergence; the percentage of successful bootstrap replicates is specified at the nodes (1,000 replicates). ONNV (o’nyong-nyong virus) prototype sequence was included to root the tree. Scale bar indicates number of nucleotide substitutions per site.

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