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Volume 15, Number 2—February 2009

Research

Severe Dengue Epidemics in Sri Lanka, 2003–2006

Nalaka Kanakaratne, Wahala M.P.B. Wahala, William B. Messer, Hasitha A. Tissera, Aruna Shahani, Nihal Abeysinghe, Aravinda M. de Silva, and Maya Gunasekera1
Author affiliations: Genetech Research Institute, Colombo, Sri Lanka (N. Kanakaratne, M. Gunasekera); University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA (W.M.P.B. Wahala, W.B. Messer, A.M de Silva); Ministry of Health, Colombo (H.A. Tissera, N. Abeysinghe); Apollo Hospital, Colombo (A. Shahani)

Main Article

Figure 4

Phylogram of dengue serotype 1 viruses (DENV-1) from Sri Lanka (SL), 1983–2004, and other DENV-1 viruses. The tree is based on a 498-bp fragment for positions 2056–2554 coding portions of envelope protein and nonstructural protein 1. Evolutionary history was inferred by using minimum evolution method (12). Percentages of replicate trees in which the associated taxa clustered in the bootstrap test (1,000 replicates) are shown next to the branches (13). Phylogenetic analyses were conducted in MEGA

Figure 4. Phylogram of dengue serotype 1 viruses (DENV-1) from Sri Lanka (SL), 1983–2004, and other DENV-1 viruses. The tree is based on a 498-bp fragment for positions 2056–2554 coding portions of envelope protein and nonstructural protein 1. Evolutionary history was inferred by using minimum evolution method (12). Percentages of replicate trees in which the associated taxa clustered in the bootstrap test (1,000 replicates) are shown next to the branches (13). Phylogenetic analyses were conducted in MEGA4 (14). The tree was rooted by using a DENV-1 sylvatic strain. Classification and naming of different DENV-1 genotypes is based on the report by Rico-Hesse (5). Scale bar represents number of base substitutions per site.

Main Article

1Deceased.

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