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Volume 15, Number 3—March 2009

Dispatch

Detection of Newly Described Astrovirus MLB1 in Stool Samples from Children

Stacy R. Finkbeiner, Binh-Minh Le, Lori R. Holtz, Gregory A. Storch, and David WangComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA

Main Article

Figure 2

Phylogenetic analysis of astrovirus MLB1 (AstV-MLB1) isolates. A region of the serine protease (A) and the capsid (B) of each virus detected by the AstV-MLB1–specific primers was amplified and sequenced. Multiple sequence alignments were then generated with these sequences and the corresponding regions of known astroviruses using ClustalX (www.clustal.org). PAUP* (Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA, USA) was used to generate phylogenetic trees; bootstrap values (>700) from 1,000 replicates ar

Figure 2. Phylogenetic analysis of astrovirus MLB1 (AstV-MLB1) isolates. A region of the serine protease (A) and the capsid (B) of each virus detected by the AstV-MLB1–specific primers was amplified and sequenced. Multiple sequence alignments were then generated with these sequences and the corresponding regions of known astroviruses using ClustalX (www.clustal.org). PAUP* (Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA, USA) was used to generate phylogenetic trees; bootstrap values (>700) from 1,000 replicates are shown. The previously identified AstV-MLB1 isolate (9,10) and the isolates from this study are shown in boldface. Scale bars indicate number of amino acid substitutions per site.

Main Article

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