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Volume 15, Number 6—June 2009

Letter

Recurrent Human Rhinovirus Infections in Infants with Refractory Wheezing

Piyada Linsuwanon, Sunchai Payungporn, Rujipat Samransamruajkit, Apiradee Theamboonlers, and Yong PoovorawanComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Main Article

Figure

Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences of the virus capsid protein (VP4) region of 5 human rhinovirus (HRV) strains (shown in boldface) isolated from 289 nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens, including those of 2 infants with refractory wheezing (C1 and C2), on the basis of amplification of VP4/2 by seminested reverse transcription–PCR. The tree was constructed by using the neighbor-joining method and Kimura’s 2-parameter distance with bootstrap replicated from 1,000 trees by using MEGA 4.0

Figure. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences of the virus capsid protein (VP4) region of 5 human rhinovirus (HRV) strains (shown in boldface) isolated from 289 nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens, including those of 2 infants with refractory wheezing (C1 and C2), on the basis of amplification of VP4/2 by seminested reverse transcription–PCR. The tree was constructed by using the neighbor-joining method and Kimura’s 2-parameter distance with bootstrap replicated from 1,000 trees by using MEGA 4.0 (www.megasoftware.net). Scale bar indicates number of nucleotide substitutions per site. Human enterovirus (HEV) was used as an outgroup for comparison.

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