Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Volume 15, Number 7—July 2009

Dispatch

Genetically Diverse Coronaviruses in Wild Bird Populations of Northern England

Laura A. HughesComments to Author , Carol Savage, Clive Naylor, Malcolm Bennett, Julian Chantrey, and Richard Jones
Author affiliations: University of Liverpool, Neston, United Kingdom

Main Article

Appendix Figure

Multiple-sequence alignment of a fragment of the 3? untranslated region of coronaviruses detected in wild birds in this study and other previously published group 3 coronavirus sequences from wild birds and a beluga whale. Viruses detected by this study are marked with an asterisk. GenBank accession numbers for all sequences are shown in parentheses. Identical nucleotides are marked with a period (.). Sequences were aligned using the Clustal program within the MEGA 4.0 software package (10).

Appendix Figure. Multiple-sequence alignment of a fragment of the 3? untranslated region of coronaviruses detected in wild birds in this study and other previously published group 3 coronavirus sequences from wild birds and a beluga whale. Viruses detected by this study are marked with an asterisk. GenBank accession numbers for all sequences are shown in parentheses. Identical nucleotides are marked with a period (.). Sequences were aligned using the Clustal program within the MEGA 4.0 software package (10).

Main Article

Top of Page

 

Past Issues

Select a Past Issue:

Art in Science - Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases
Now available for order



CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives, Protecting People, Saving Money. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO