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Volume 16, Number 7—July 2010

Research

Human Infection with Rickettsia felis, Kenya

Allen L. Richards, Ju Jiang, Sylvia Omulo, Ryan Dare, Khalif Abdirahman, Abdile Ali, Shanaaz K. Sharif, Daniel R. Feikin, Robert F. Breiman, and M. Kariuki NjengaComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Naval Medical Research Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA (A.L. Richards, J. Jiang); Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland, USA (A.L. Richards); US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Nairobi, Kenya (S. Omulo, R. Dare, D.R. Feikin, R.F. Breiman, M.K. Njenga); Kenya Ministry of Health, Nairobi (K.A. Abdirahman, A. Ali, S.K. Sharif)

Main Article

Table 1

Molecular detection results and characteristics of rickettsial DNA preparations in acute-phase serum samples from 6 patients who had fever, Garissa Provincial Hospital, North Eastern Province, Kenya, 2006–2008*

Patient no. 17-kDa gene sequence ompB sequence RF plasmid
1 100% identification with Rickettsia felis 100% identification with R. felis 100% identification with R. felis
2 100% identification with R. felis
3
4 100% identification with R. felis
5
6 100% identification with R. felis

*ompB, outer membrane protein B gene. All samples were positive by Rick17 PCR and Rfelis qPCR and negative by Trick quantitative PCR (qPCR), RF plasmid, and RFδ plasmid. Rick17 qPCR is specific for the 17-kDa antigen gene of Rickettsia species; Trick qPCR is specific for a portion of ompB that is common to tick-borne rickettsiae; Rfelis qPCR is specific for a portion of ompB that is common to R. felis.

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