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Volume 18, Number 1—January 2012

Letter

Visceral Leishmaniasis during Italian Renaissance, 1522–1562

Andreas G. NerlichComments to Author , Raffaella Bianucci, Anna Trisciuoglio, Gabriele Schönian, Markus Ball, Valentina Giuffra, Beatrice Bachmeier, Carsten M. Pusch, Ezio Ferroglio, and Gino Fornaciari
Author affiliations: Hospital München-Bogenhausen, Munich, Germany (A.G. Nerlich); University of Turin, Turin, Italy (R. Bianucci, A. Trisciuoglio, E. Ferroglio); Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany (G. Schönian); University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany (M. Ball, C.M. Pusch); University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy (R. Bianucci, V. Giuffra, G. Fornaciari); University of Munich, Munich (B. Bachmeier)

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Figure

Figure. PCR amplification of a 123-bp fragment of kinetoplastid mitochondrial DNA of Leishmania spp. from Eleonora from Toledo (lane 6, arrow). Lane 1, molecular mass standard; lanes 2–5, ancient controls; lanes 7–9, blank controls.

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