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Volume 18, Number 4—April 2012

Historical Review

Malaria in Highlands of Ecuador since 1900

Lauren L. PinaultComments to Author  and Fiona F. Hunter
Author affiliations: Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada

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Figure 2

Railway construction at base of the Devil’s Nose switchbacks, Ecuador, showing railway on the left and stone-lined riverbed on the right, where several pools can be seen (likely formed by falling rocks from construction), which would likely have provided suitable habitat for Anopheles pseudopunctipennis larvae. Photograph: Historical Archive of Banco Central and García Idrovo (14).

Figure 2. Railway construction at base of the Devil’s Nose switchbacks, Ecuador, showing railway on the left and stone-lined riverbed on the right, where several pools can be seen (likely formed by falling rocks from construction), which would likely have provided suitable habitat for Anopheles pseudopunctipennis larvae. Photograph: Historical Archive of Banco Central and García Idrovo (14).

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